Duke Energy

Duke Energy power lines, energy
Duke Energy

Ohioans could see a new charge in their electric bills as early as June, now that state regulators have approved plans by FirstEnergy and AEP to guarantee income for struggling coal plants. But while opponents are fighting the ruling, those utilities are touting the benefits.

Groups against the so-called coal plant bailout say the ruling from the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio gives AEP and FirstEnergy an unfair competitive advantage.

But AEP President, Pablo Vegas, says his utility needed the ability to charge customers more in order to stabilize costs.

New Proposal Aims To Derail Plans For Energy Rate Increase

Jan 14, 2016
Duke Energy power lines, energy
Duke Energy

Independent energy provider Dynegy's entrance into the the crowded Ohio energy market could affect competitors plans to raise rates. 

AEP and First Energy have asked state regulators to allow them to hike customers' bills to ensure energy production and guarantee income for their struggling coal plants through 2030. 

Texas-based Dynegy recently bought several coal and natural gas plants from Duke Energy. Now, the company says it can counter plans from AEP and FirstEnergy by offering the same amount of energy for $5 billion less.

liftarn / Openclipart

The state of Ohio has been investigating its competitive energy market for a year now, and the state reports electric competition is growing, which means more options for consumers.

Energy choice itself doesn’t look like much: the lights go on, the lights go off, and you pay your monthly bill the same way. But in the past, a utility company—the name that’s on most people’s electric bills—also owned the actual power plant. Electric choice, which was passed in Ohio over ten years ago, is gradually moving the market away from that system.