Drugs

Francis Storr

A decision by Ohio Governor John Kasich to change the way doctors can bill Medicaid for a painkiller addition treatment may make it easier to obtain in the long run.  The administration says the change could ultimately affect far more patients than a $1 million pilot program for ex-offenders vetoed by the governor last month.

Under the new change taking effect in October, pharmacies can bill Medicaid directly for Vivitrol and have the drug delivered to a doctor's office without an upfront payment.

New efforts to crack down on drug trafficking in Ohio include legislation targeting hidden compartments in vehicles and changes in how drivers can use the Highway Patrol hotline.

Authorities have raided a doctor's two offices and home in southwest Ohio, seizing boxes of records in an investigation of possible prescription drug abuse.

The Dayton Daily News reports that 69-year-old Dr. Han M. Yang says authorities are "off-base" in their allegations. He says he has surrendered his license to practice medicine in Ohio and will give up his practice. He also says he will seek an attorney.

The state says drug dealers around Ohio are developing new sources for prescription painkillers by buying them from senior citizens, sometimes as the patients leave pharmacies.

The report by the Ohio Substance Abuse Monitoring Network also blames the state's continuing rise of heroin use on addicts switching from prescription painkillers, which are more expensive and harder to obtain.

Orman Hall, director of the Ohio Department of Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services, says once people become addicted to painkillers it's almost inevitable they'll switch to heroin.

COLUMBUS, Ohio - A judge is scheduled to sentence the final two defendants today in a marijuana case that state investigators have called an example of cartel-sponsored drug production. All 11 men arrested last September after a sweep of a growing operation in Muskingum County have pleaded guilty.

warrantedarrest / Flick Creative Commons

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) - Federal prosecutors are wrapping up their case against 11 men charged with cultivating thousands of marijuana plants in what the state's former top cop called evidence of cartel-sponsored operations taking root in Ohio.

All 11 have pleaded guilty and seven have received sentences ranging from a year to 18 months in prison.  U.S. District Judge Thomas Rose was scheduled to sentence three more defendants Friday in Dayton, with a final sentencing Aug. 17.

Keith Allison / Flickr

HAMILTON, Ohio – Secret indictments passed down by the Butler County grand jury on Monday led to a joint drug roundup operation that has arrested a total of 44 people on felony charges.

Some arrests were made in Cincinnati, Dayton, and Fostoria, however most took place in Butler County. The roundup is the result of numerous undercover drug operations over the past year.

Mercy Manor sits on a tree-lined street on Dayton's historic west side. It looks like many homes around the city, but inside, lives are being changed.

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