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Drugs

www.heroinaddiction.com

Ohio Department of Public Safety records indicate a drug overdose antidote that can help save addicts on the brink of death was administered more than 12,600 times around the state last year.

Naloxone blocks brain receptors, immediately pulling people out of a potentially fatal overdose.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich signed a bill last year expanding availability of the drug. It let doctors authorize individuals to hand out a drug overdose antidote to addicts, their friends and family members without requiring a prescription.

Various Pills Medicine Overdose
Chaos

Ohio Gov. John Kasich and a coalition of state medical leaders have announced guidelines meant to reduce the prescribing of painkillers for short-term pain.

The guidelines recommend using alternatives to painkillers with addictive qualities when treating pain from injuries and surgery that generally lasts less than 12 weeks.

Dr. Mary DiOrio, medical director for the Ohio Department of Health, says the guidelines also call for the minimum number of pills needed when such drugs are deemed necessary.

www.heroinaddiction.com

Local county coroners are still pulling together totals for 2015 drug overdose fatalities, but most are already reporting higher numbers than the year before.

 

Clark, Greene, and Warren Counties counties all saw an increase in overdose fatalities in 2015 due to heroin and other opiate usage.

 

The exception, so far, is Montgomery County, where overdose death were down. The coroner there, Dr. Kent Harshbarger, says use of the anti-overdose medicine Narcan could be responsible for some of the decrease.

Various Pills Medicine Overdose
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Ohio lawmakers leading the fight to reduce the state's deadly addictions epidemic are backing a federal effort to curb the prescribing of painkillers.
 
Rep. Robert Sprague, a Findlay Republican, said Monday he's throwing his support behind proposed guidelines governing painkillers by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
 
Sprague also called on anyone affected by drug abuse to contact the CDC to support the guidelines.
 

PHDMC

As WYSO reported in June, in Montgomery County heroin overdoses climbed 226 percent from 2010 to 2014.  2015 numbers aren’t out yet, but they are expected to be up as well. With those high rates in mind, a Fairborn Municipal Court judge has started a new program to tackle the problem. Judge Beth Root spearheaded the new drug court program and talked to WYSO’s Jerry Kenney how it works.

PHDMC

Dayton officials say in spite of efforts to lower the rate of accidental drug overdose deaths in the Miami Valley, the numbers are still climbing.

In Montgomery County, unintentional drug overdose deaths increased 63 percent from just two years ago—from 226 deaths in 2013 to 264 in 2014.  Heroin overdoses climbed 226 percent from 2010 to 2014.         

Ohio Launches Drug Prevention Effort For Businesses

Jan 15, 2015
Various Pills Medicine Overdose
Chaos

Ohio is launching a new drug prevention effort aimed at businesses concerned about substance abuse among employees.
 
The "Start Talking Business Impact Zone" is a follow-up to a year-old program that encourages adults to talk to children about drug use as part of Ohio's efforts to combat a prescription painkiller addictions epidemic.
 
The update announced Thursday will help businesses promote drug-free workplaces and wellness programs for workers.
 

Dayton’s East End Takes On Heroin Epidemic

Jun 5, 2014
Twin Towers in Dayton. St. Mary's Church, in the background, is central to the neighborhood's history. east side east end
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Accidental overdoses, including those caused by heroin, continue to rise in Ohio and in Montgomery County. Now a local non-profit is joining the fight to turn those numbers around.

www.heroinaddiction.com

Unintentional drug overdoses are still on the rise in Montgomery County: new numbers released Tuesday by public health officials show unintentional drug deaths jumped from 162 in 2012 to 226 in 2013.

Overdoses have been increasing since 2010, but officials call the 71 percent jump in deaths “unprecedented."

Bill Wharton with Public Health Dayton and Montgomery County says it’s going to take everyone in the community to deal with the problem.

An Ohio bill would require schools to include information in their health curricula about preventing abuse of prescription drugs.

State law already mandates instruction about nutrition, alcohol abuse and personal safety among other topics.

Under the proposal passed by the House last week, schools would be required to update their health curricula with information about the addictive properties of prescription opioids and their links to heroin.

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