Downtown Dayton Partnership

Kroger in Huber Heights. Experts say if customers show they are willing to drive a few miles to a suburban location, it takes away the incentive for chains to build in limited downtown space. grocery store food
Nicholas Eckhart / Flickr/Creative Commons

There’s a lot going on in downtown Dayton: in some ways, it’s growing. Housing is being built or redeveloped, and small retail and restaurant businesses are taking root. In other ways, it’s struggling, with around a 30 percent vacancy rate for office buildings and a high rate of tax delinquency, including in some high-profile empty buildings like the Arcade.

African Children's Choir will offer a concert tonight at Covenant Presbyterian Church, Springfield at 7:00pm.  Come and experience a performance that shows the beauty, dignity and potential of each African child! The African Children's Choir melts the hearts of audiences with their charming smiles, beautiful voices and lively African songs and dance.

The Downtown Dayton Partnership announced that its signature initiative is almost fully funded. The River Run Project has raised 3.8 million dollars from both public and private sector donors. The project is the next phase of development at RiverScape MetroPark, which aims to create a regional downtown destination. It includes the removal of a dam that’s considered dangerous and the construction of two boulder-like structures that along the Great Miami River.

Downtown Dayton Partnership’s Annual Meeting and Greater Downtown Dayton Plan is today, 3:30-5:00pm, Engineers Club. Come see what's happening in downtown Dayton. Downtown enthusiasts and Plan supporters will deliver rapid visual presentations showcasing all the positive news and momentum in our center city.

And then from 5-10pm is downtown Dayton’s First Friday.

Tonight is First Friday check it out at downtowndayton.org. There are lots of locations throughout downtown and the Oregon Arts District….entertainment, art demonstrations, live music and you will be hearing Rev. Cool’s Around The Fringe because a lot of places have dialed their radio to 91.3, WYSO.

The Occupy Dayton movement has agreed to temporarily relocate to Dave Hall Plaza on Main Street. The agreement was reached to allow for the set up of the annual Grande Illumination light display. The group was somewhat divided after Sandy Gudorf, the president of the Downtown Dayton Partnership, approached the occupiers with the proposal for temporary relocation.

However, at a general assembly meeting, a majority of the occupiers voted in favor of the relocation for the ceremony. Occupier Dana Fleetham says there was disagreement leading up to the decision to move.

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for November 20, 2011 containing the following stories:

-Jerry Kenney interviews Mike Ervin from the Downtown Dayton Partnership about the Dayton Foundation's recent grant towards Five Rivers Metroparks' River Run project.

-The latest installment in the SOCHE Talks: Modeling Climate Change in the Miami Valley

-Poor Will's Almanack: November 15 -21, 2011, by Bill Felker

Remember Prometheus? You know, the Greek god who stole fire and brought it down to us?  Tonight and tomorrow you can hear three musical interpretations of Promethus. One of the composer is Ludwig Beethoven, and another is Franz Lizt. The third interpretation is an American composer William Bolcom. Check it out at Daytonphilharmonic.com

Stivers School for the Arts is providing their theater presentation Friday and Saturday.  The play is Steel Magnolias.

Photo by: Susan Gartner

This Friday marks the fall edition of Urban Nights in downtown Dayton.  It's an event that showcases the music, arts, dining and housing that downtown Dayton has to offer.  On this edition of Kaleidoscope, Juliet Fromholt spoke with Kristen Wicker and Krystal Luketic from the Downtown Dayton Partnership about the origins of Urban Nights and the new features at this fall's event.

Interview Highlights:

Kristen Wicker on the early days of Urban Nights

Photo courtesy of Kristen Wicker

Some people call it downtown's biggest party with live music stages and roving performers throughout the city. But Urban Nights isn't just about the party. It's a showcase for the arts, dining, music and even the housing available in downtown Dayton.  This bi-annual event is expected to bring 30 thousand people downtown this evening.

Kristen Wicker with the Downtown Dayton Partnership says that it's also an important way to highlight the 9 out of 10 downtown businesses that are locally owned and operated.

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