Dayton water

Imagine you wake up and go to get in the shower, or brush your teeth, and there’s nothing coming out of the tap. Imagine this happens with no notice, and sometimes goes on for days.

Well, this scenario is real—and we’re not talking about Flint or any city water system. It turns out trailer parks across the country have problems with unreliable water.

 

The Great Miami River is connected to the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, where Dayton gets its water.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

  TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — Ohio's environmental regulators are ordering two wastewater treatment plants in southwest Ohio to reduce the amount of phosphorus that goes into the Great Miami River.

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency last month rejected a request from Dayton and Montgomery County to delay setting the limits.

The state EPA says its research shows the plants are sending too much phosphorus into the river during the summer and that can add up to more toxic algae blooms.

Dayton City Commission Passes Water Protection Changes

Jul 30, 2015
The Dayton City Commission has updated the city's water ordinance.
Wikipedia

The Dayton City Commission has passed a controversial set of changes to the city’s source water protection program.

 

The current code regulates the chemicals around Dayton’s well fields, where most of Montgomery County’s drinking water comes from. Since the late 80s, the zoning code has legislated the amount of potentially hazardous substances that can be stored near the wells. A related regulation, which will remain in place, provides incentives for companies that had chemicals grandfathered in to reduce those chemicals.

 

Activists Renew Concerns About Dayton Water Policy

Jul 22, 2015

Activists are gearing up for another round of debate over the city of Dayton’s source water protection policy.

After more than a year of discussion, a compromise plan will go before the Dayton City Commission next week that would update the policy, which dates back to the late 1980s.

Source Water Protection Still Stirring Up Controversy

Mar 11, 2015

The debate over Dayton’s source water protection policy is still simmering, although the issues have changed somewhat since the idea of an update to the policy was first floated last summer.

Army Corps Completes Great Miami River Corridor Study

Jan 12, 2015
The Great Miami River is connected to the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, where Dayton gets its water.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has finished a one-year study of the Great Miami River Corridor, which looked at opportunities for economic development along a 99-mile stretch. The area studied runs from around Sidney, up in Shelby County, down to the city of Hamilton in Butler County.

More than 25 people out of nearly a hundred in attendance took the mike at a town hall meeting about Dayton’s drinking water protections Monday evening.

The Fire That Changed How Dayton Sees Water

Nov 16, 2014

The City of Dayton is considering changes to its drinking water protections, and a public town hall meeting is set for Monday evening to hear feedback on the latest proposal.

An image of the revised source water protection policy map for the city of Dayton's wellfields.
City of Dayton

The city of Dayton has released new proposed changes to its drinking water protections following a series of public meetings and meetings with stakeholders over the last six months. Water Department Director Tammi Clements presented an outline of the latest proposals to the Dayton City Commission Wednesday morning.

Dayton Citizens' Water Brigade To Hold Teach-In

Oct 4, 2014

 A new group called the Dayton Citizens’ Water Brigade is holding a teach-in tonight about the City of Dayton’s water protection policy.

The group opposes changes to the policy that’s been in place for over 25 years. The policy was created as an attempt to keep hazardous chemicals away from the wellfields that supply water to 400,000 people around Dayton, including most Montgomery County suburbs. It forbids new chemicals within a set geographic area, and provides incentives for companies to reduce chemical storage already in place through a buy-back program.

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