Dayton Public Schools

The Ohio Supreme Court is considering the role of the school bus driver for student safety.
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Dayton Public Schools students are heading back to class on Thursday, and the district’s bus drivers will have a slight bump in pay when they return. More money was a sticking point during contract talks that went on for more than a year between the drivers' union and the Dayton Public Schools (DPS).

The contract agreement reached this spring required DPS to commission a study comparing its pay with other Ohio districts.

Beginning DPS drivers will now earn $13.31 per hour, which is a 2 percent increase. The district’s most seasoned drivers will make $18.53.

New State Rules Mean More Charters For Some Cities

Jul 29, 2015
Arise Academy in Dayton is now closed, and former leaders of the school have been convicted of federal crimes.
User: Paradox 56 / Flickr/Creative Commons

The state of Ohio has new guidelines for how it handles failing public school districts. Part of that law paves the way for an increase in charter schools.

The new rules would allow the state to recruit charter sponsors to come to a city with a troubled district. And right now, Youngstown City Schools is the only affected district. Senate Education Committee Chair Peggy Lehner says this push means the state is walking a fine line between improving its traditional public schools and relying on charters to educate students.

Dayton school officials want feedback and ideas from parents about ways to improve the district.
facebook.com/DaytonPublicSchools

The Dayton Public Schools Board of Education is drawing attention to the differences between the state’s traditional public and charter schools. The board wants charters on a more level playing field.

Dayton, DPS Offering Incentive To New Teachers

Jun 12, 2015
Arise Academy in Dayton is now closed, and former leaders of the school have been convicted of federal crimes.
User: Paradox 56 / Flickr/Creative Commons

First-year teachers in the Dayton Public School District could receive a $1,000 stipend to live and work within Dayton city limits.

The incentive is part of the City of Learners initiative launched by Mayor Nan Whaley and DPS earlier this year. There’s a need for high-qualified teachers in the district, which is expecting mass retirements over the next few years--some due to changes in the state’s retirement system. Competition with other charter and private schools in Dayton also affects hiring.

State Releases Recommendations For Dayton Schools

May 13, 2015
Kindergarten teacher Elizabeth Toomey is using cubes to help her students during a math lesson in Spanish.
Ariel Van Cleave / WYSO

Following a visit earlier this year, The Ohio Department of Education has released its recommendations for improving Dayton Public Schools.

To the state, DPS is considered “at risk.” A district review team was in Dayton in January to talk to teachers, administrators, parents and students to pinpoint areas in need of change. The big themes from the report are “consistency” and “training.” Team members found staff professional development was lacking, programs and missions changed too often and opportunities for students were not equal throughout the district.

State Senator Peggy Lehner heads the Senate Education Committee.
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The Ohio Senate Advisory Committee on Testing has released its recommendations for changes to next year’s PARCC exams. Those are the tests tied to the state’s new Common Core standards.

The group suggests having one test per year instead of two, spending fewer days on testing and scheduling exams toward the end of the school year.

Dayton's Belmont High School has become a hub for Latino students.
Ariel Van Cleave / WYSO

In the process of reporting the Graduating Latino series, WYSO found out that Latino students who attend private schools in Dayton have a better chance at success than their public school counterparts and there are a few reasons why.

When Laura Yuqui first arrived in Dayton, she sent her son Jason to one of the city’s public elementary schools. And as she explained through an interpreter, things didn’t go well.

Still No Agreement Between DPS And Bus Drivers

Apr 14, 2015
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Dayton Public Schools bus drivers are planning a strike. The Ohio Association of Public Schools Employees Local #627 filed its intent to strike last week.

Members have said they want an increase in the hourly wage for beginning bus drivers to stay competitive with neighboring districts that offer about $2 more per hour, as well as paid training days. And after another meeting Monday, the union and Dayton school board are no closer to an agreement.

Kindergarten teacher Elly Mallen leads her class through a lesson on saying numbers and months in Spanish.
Ariel Van Cleave / WYSO

About a quarter of the students who attend Ruskin Elementary School on the east side of Dayton’s don’t speak English as their first language. Of the 11 different languages spoken at the school, Spanish is the most prevalent—and it was the Latino students who inspired the staff at Ruskin to take a different approach to teaching. The school is in its third year of a successful dual language program.
 

The Ohio Supreme Court is considering the role of the school bus driver for student safety.
Wikimedia

Bus drivers for Dayton Public Schools could go on strike later this month. Members of the drivers’ union rejected the district’s latest contract offer Thursday night and agreed to file a 10-day strike notice.

The Dayton Daily News reports the 160 school bus drivers transport more than 11,000 students daily. That includes DPS students as well as kids from parochial, charter and private schools.

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