Dayton Development Coalition

A Lockheed Martin F-35 air plane air force
Mark Jones Jr. / Flickr

President Obama’s budget proposals have been making waves this week. He and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel are pushing to downsize the Army and Air Force and finally end the war in Afghanistan.

But buried deeper in the President's defense budget, are line items for scientific research, says Michael Gessel with the Dayton Development Coalition.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The Federal Aviation Administration handed down its decision earlier this week that the Dayton region was not selected as one of the six national test sites for commercial drones. The news comes after months of preparation from business and industry officials, as well as Ohio’s political leaders. But Chris Ford with the Dayton Development Coalition says it won’t change the game for the drone industry in the region.

Open Clipart User nebu

 The Dayton area has proposed $30 million worth of economic development projects for Ohio’s 2015-2016 budget. It’s the first time in five years local groups have had a chance to request construction funds, and the governor’s Office of Budget and Management (OBM) is going through over 100 proposals from around the state now.

Southwest Ohio Passed Over For Drone Testing

Dec 31, 2013
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

 Southwest Ohio was passed over as a drone test site. On December 30, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announced it will develop test sites for unmanned vehicles in Alaska, Nevada, New York, North Dakota, Texas and Virginia, which the agency says together provide the necessary climatic and geographic diversity for testing.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Right now, if you can spare the cash, you can buy your own drone—or unmanned aerial vehicle, as the industry likes to call them. You can buy local, too, because the Dayton area is trying to shape itself as a hub for the growing commercial drone industry. In a couple years local companies would like to be using them for agricultural purposes, emergency response, entertainment, even surveillance.

"The FAA really needs to address the procedures and policies associated with flying these systems," says Maurice McDonald at the Dayton Development Coalition.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Click here for the extended story on American Public Media's Marketplace.

The Federal Aviation Administration is expected to make a decision soon about where to open up air space for the testing of commercial drones. Southwest Ohio is competing to become one of six sites around the country as the FAA prepares to regulate the commercial drone industry by late 2015.

Gov't. Shutdown May Have Long Term Consequences

Oct 5, 2013
Flickr Creative Commons user soundfromwayout

The government shutdown continues, as do the furloughs affecting civilian employees at Wright-Patterson. One estimate has put the economic impact at $5 million per furlough day that the region loses. Nearly 9,000 base employees are currently out of work.

The news in the short-term is certainly not good. Michael Gessel with the Dayton Development Coalition says to put that into perspective, "it would be the same economic impact if LexisNexis, Honda and AK Steel closed down and let everybody off."

Emily McCord

Unmanned Aerial Systems, or UAS, was the focus of an informational meeting Wednesday in Xenia. Ohio has partnered with Indiana and applied to become one of six national centers for unmanned systems and Congressman Mike Turner with the Dayton Development Coalition held the meeting to build awareness about what UAS could bring to Ohio.

The Dayton Development Coalition has wrapped up its annual trip to Washington, D.C. this week. The fly-in includes business, educational and government leaders from the area. This week on PoliticsOhio, Emily McCord is joined by Michael Gessel with the Dayton Development Coalition to talk about the trip.

The budget cuts handed down to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base this week include a civilian hiring freeze, the elimination of some temporary positions and the curtailing of certain travel and purchasing costs. Emily McCord speaks to Vice President for federal programs at the Dayton Development Coalition, Michael Gessel, to discuss how these small measures now could signal larger cuts in the future.