Dayton Children's Hospital

Children's Hospital of Dayton

Health coverage for 130,000 Ohio children through the Children’s Health Insurance Program or CHIP is set to expire later this year. 

Ohio's Democratic U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown was at Dayton Children’s Hospital on Monday to announce his plans for extending the CHIP program set to expire in September. Brown says he’ll be the lead sponsor of legislation to address the issue.

Dayton Children's Hospital

Dayton Children’s hospital broke ground Thursday on a new eight-story building on its campus. The center is part of a long-term plan to improve patient care. 

Officials at Children’s say their current facilities can’t serve all their needs.  The 260,000-square-foot tower will house a new intensive care unit for newborns, a Cancer and Blood Disorder Center, and new patient care units.

But the hospital's President and CEO, Deborah Feldman, says the long-term plan is about improving the hospital, not necessarily expanding it.

Downtown Dayton’s Tech Town has a new tenant as of this week: 100 employees from the IT department at the Dayton Children’s Hospital are beginning to move into a third of Building III while the hospital does a major new construction project.

Roundtable discussions on infant mortality rates continue in Dayton Thursday, and members of the Ohio Senate, public health officials and health professionals in Dayton will gather with a common purpose in mind – to lower infant death rates in Ohio.

According to officials at Dayton Children’s Hospital, in Montgomery County one infant dies every 4-6 weeks.

It’s a statewide problem. Ohio has one of the highest infant mortality rates in the country. 

Ohio’s Children’s hospitals will be getting two million dollars for two different types of research.

Anthony Albright / Flickr

COLUMBUS, Ohio - Ten people in Ohio have been sickened with salmonella poisoning in a national outbreak authorities say appears linked to eating ground turkey.

An overall 77 cases in 26 states have been reported. One person has died, but not in Ohio. The state is among those with the highest number of cases. A spokeswoman for the Ohio Department of Health says people became sick from April 22 to June 26.

When the first cases of Aids started showing up, the prognosis for adults with the disease wasn't good. As children began to be born with HIV, The situation was just as dire and death rates were high.

"Early on, we didn't have much treatment we could do to prevent the infection from worsening, so it was really symptomatic care treating the infections, treating the complications, but the mortality was pretty high, and all those kids unfortunately died at a very young age," says Dr. Sherman Alter is the Director of Infectious Diseases at Children's Medical Center of Dayton.