Congress

WYSO

Several Dayton groups are asking Congressman Mike Turner of Ohio’s 10th district to help renew emergency unemployment benefits. A bipartisan Senate bill expected to pass this week has found little support in the House.

Sherrod Brown
WCPN

President Obama released his budget proposal for fiscal year 2015 Tuesday, and among the many reforms, cuts and expansions, he’s calling for an expansion of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), a program benefiting low-income Americans.

a-10 military fighter plane jet airplane
Omono / Flickr

 Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has announced some details about the proposed military budget to be released by President Obama next week, and the Air Force—including Wright-Patterson Air Force Base—could see some major changes in the coming years.

This week a congressional committee is expected to come out with a compromise on the Farm Bill after months of debate. While the rumor on Capitol Hill is that a compromise has been reached on funding for food assistance, dairy programs remain a source of contention.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The U.S. Congress is on its way to a budget deal a couple weeks ahead of the January 1, 2014 deadline, but the deal doesn’t include extending emergency unemployment benefits. That means around 40,000 Ohioans could see their payments end this month.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

A national coalition of law enforcement officials is calling on Congress to fully fund preschool programs for low-income kids. Over 30 Ohio police chiefs, sheriffs and prosecutors have signed a letter to Congress asking legislators to pass President Obama’s proposal to put $75 billion into early childhood education over ten years. They say it would ultimately pay itself off in the reduced costs of incarceration.

Openclipart

 Conservative leaders from Ohio are headed to Washington this week to lobby for immigration reform in a collaboration between businesses, evangelicals, and law enforcement. Twenty Ohio leaders are among the hundreds who have meetings set with House Republicans Tuesday. While the Senate passed a comprehensive bill earlier this year, the House has yet to bring a bill to the floor.

WYSO/Lewis Wallace

As the federal government shutdown drags into its third week, it has become a sort of background noise, present but not always noticeable. Unless you’re a federal worker, that is; Justine Kelly’s a case in point.

She works at the Social Security Administration, and has been working without pay for weeks.

“This is just so demoralizing,” she said at a Democratic party event in Dayton Monday. “I feel like nobody cares. I feel nobody’s listening, like this is all a game.”

Most civilian workers are back at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, although officials say normal operations will remain difficult during the partial government shutdown. But across the Dayton area, Wright-Patt isn’t alone in its woes since the partial federal government shutdown began Oct. 1.

 Nearly 9,000 civilian workers went back to work Monday at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. That’s after the Department of Defense reinterpreted a new law in order to end furlough days.

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