WYSO

Commentary

slappytheseal / Flickr Creative Commons

I have fond memories of puffballs and their moon because twenty-eight years ago, a friend called me up with some news.

“There’s a lady out on the street,” he said, “with a real big mushroom.”

I went to see the sight, and there, indeed was a young woman holding what was to become the world’s largest puffball mushroom (calvatia gigantea), 18.38 pounds, 77 inches around.

In our conversation years later, the woman told me that her giant fungus (“Puffy, as she called it,”) had made the 1990 and 1991 editions of the Guinness Book of World Records.

Tonight you can go to an outdoor movie. "Homeward Bound" will be shown outdoors at SICSA in Kettering. Local vendors will be on site from 8:00 PM - 9:15 PM with pet-related items for sale, as well as snacks and treats. The movie will begin at 9:15 PM. You are encouraged to bring blankets and chairs for seating in the lawn.

Seeking a Bit of the Wright Brothers' Grit

Aug 25, 2016
Wright Brothers bench
designatednaphour / Flickr Creative Commons

Last week Kettering writer Rebecca Rine sent her kids back to school, and it caused her to think about FOCUS:  how to teach it to her kids and how to refine it in her own life.   In this commentary, which first appeared in the Dayton Daily news - she explains that her inspiration is the Wright Brothers.

Tyler Sprague / Flickr Creative Commons

Having dropped below the celestial equator in the first week of late summer, the sun has now left the stability of Leo and entered the more volatile sign of Virgo, the first of the most violent periods of change in the second half of the year.

At the transition between Leo’s great plateau of heat and color in July and Libra’s sudden collapse of the forest canopy in early fall, Virgo brings the first turning of the leaves and the first chance of frost.

ozpagan / Flickr Creative Commons

The Katydid Moon is waxing bright and gibbous these evenings. It will be  full on the 18th dominating the sky sky and tides this week.

The full moon is always overhead in the middle of the night, and if you walk under its glow, you might see the high bloom of velvetleaf, jimsonweed, prickly mallow, wild lettuce, ironweed and wingstem. You might pick soft elderberries and blackberries.

courtesy of PlayKettering

There are a few festivals that celebrate German traditions around the city, but Germanfest gives a glimpse of the German heritage that has given Dayton some of its cultural identity. They offer its food, drink, music, the crafts, and an appreciation of its history all while enjoying an import beer and a schnitzel. The Germanfest Picnic is tonight, Saturday and Sunday at The Carillon.

Joshua Mayer / Flickr Creative Commons

The pieces of late summer fall into place, creating the season. The heat stays, but the rhythm shifts, the tones of the leaves are different, colors and sounds and scents all pointing to September.

Cottonwood leaves are becoming pale near my house. In the park, black walnut, sumac, wild grape, sycamore, elm, box elder, and redbud are turning yellow. The katydids, which started to sing last week in my neighborhood, are in full chorus after dark. The cicadas have finally all come out and fill the afternoons.

Tour de Dayton

The Downtown Adventure Night is tonight. Get ready to experience your city in a whole new way. There are dozens of fun, active lifestyle-themed activities and there will be plenty of action waiting for you at Courthouse Square, Second Street, RiverScape MetroPark, and other downtown locations at this jam-packed urban adventure!

katydid
AFPMB / Flickr Creative Commons

Just before sunrise, I went jogging at the edge of town: I heard the loud rattle of tree crickets; chirping of field crickets; doves calling; I saw a cluster of robins scouting the pavement and yards, but there was no robin chorus, just the steady chirping of the sparrow flocks; a cardinal sang toward the edge of town, but he was the only one.

On Saturday at 10am you can go on a Hidden Oakwood Walk. Tucked into one Oakwood neighborhood you'll find three natural parks that invite calm reflection and appreciation of nature. The 1.5 mile walk will begin and end in front of Wright Library, and water will be provided.

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