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Martin LeBar / Flickr Creative Commons

On October 22, the Frog and Toad Migration Moon comes into its final quarter. The following day, called Cross-Quarter Day, the sun reaches half way between autumn equinox and winter solstice, entering the fertile but chilly sign of Scorpio.

Paladin27 / Flickr Creative Commons

The Frog and Toad Migration Moon waxes until it becomes completely full  October 15. Rising in the evening and setting in the morning, the moon will be overhead around midnight.

Full moon should strengthen the traditional mid-October cold front, increasing the chances for frost and even snow fluries.

And this stage of the lunar orb may affect more than the weather.

Michele BonDurant's one person show, Viewed and Constructed, contains her paintings and collages with oils on canvas, linen, paper and yupo. The Opening is tonight 6-9 pm at The Dutoit Gallery, Front Street Warehouse, 1001 E 2nd Street Dayton.

Is it a bug or is it an insect? Find out which is which on Saturday at 10 a.m. at Cedar Bog Nature Preserve which is between Springfield and Urbana.

Elliot McCrory / Flickr Creative Commons

Under this waxing moon, a major shift in foliage color occurs all along the 40th Parallel. The nights grow colder; the mornings sometimes bring frost. The frogs and toads wander yards and gardens looking the right places to dig in against the winter.  Throughout the fields, aster and goldenrod flowers lose their color. Brown beggartick burs stick to your stockings, and the winged seeds of Japanese knotweed fall.  In urban ponds, water lilies stop blooming.

35MM: A Musical Exhibition. In this, each photo creates a unique song, moments frozen in time. The  intricately woven collection of stories told through song re-imagines what the modern American musical can be. This is at the Schuster tonight and Saturday by the Dare 2 Defy productions.

toad
trekr / Flickr Creative Commons

The days continue clear and warm and bright. Two weeks ago, much of the landscape was still deep, late-summer green. Now, a few maples and dogwoods are red and orange, cottonwoods and catalpas and sweet gums and shagbark hickories are yellow, and grape vines and nettles are bleached with age. Locust leaves drizzle steadily to the undergrowth. The serviceberries are almost bare. The black walnut trees keep only their last fruit. Purple poison ivy and Virginia creeper outline the changes.

The Dayton Art Institute is celebrating 45 years of art, cheers and beers at its annual Oktoberfest which is Saturday & Sunday. Great art to see and buy, great food, and great entertainment….including our accordion band on Saturday afternoon.

goldenrod in the fall
Bridget Leyendecker / Flickr Creative Commons

I wander into the chilly, wet morning of an old farm on equinox, swallows circling above me, crows, blue jays and cardinals and mockingbirds, ground crickets and field crickets and tree crickets accompanying me on my walk.

Common ragweed everywhere has gone to seed. In patches of soil between slabs of old cement and blacktop grow ancient chicory and Queen Anne's lace, horseweed past its best, pink smartweed in large clumps, blushing wild dogwood, small white asters (two tiny bees huddled- one on top of the other - on one aster blossom), tall goldenrod full bloom.

Tonight in downtown Dayton there’s a huge after-work street party! Enjoy live performances and demonstrations in music, theater, dance, puppetry and more. This festival takes place on Main Street between First and Second streets. Food and beer also will be part of the fun. Friday, 5-9pm.

Sara Björk / Flickr Creative Commons

Now when the nights are cool and the moon is dark, those giant puffball mushrooms swell in the woods,  getting so big...

September fogs, the sliding sun, and one of the most radical weather shifts so far in the season, calls them up from the ground.

As the day moves to within a few degrees of equinox, other creatures tell the time as well as puffballs.

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