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Trina Alexander / Flickr Creative Commons

Throughout the eastern half of the United States, middle spring often arrives with storms, and I remember a cruel evening of hard wind and snow on the raw border between March and April.

Just before sunset, the sky turned black and the storm hummed in the bamboo outside my window. I had brought in enough logs for the wood stove that afternoon, and the fire was hearty and radiant. I hunkered down.

Have you ever heard of an Eco-camp? Want to learn more? Come see what it's all about and meet their animal ambassadors. Bring the family to this event which is tomorrow, Saturday, 1-2pm, at the Outdoor Education Center, right here in Yellow Springs On your Facebook check out Glen Helen

Following Aviation History Along The Potomac River

Mar 26, 2015
Paul Glenshaw

If you’ve ever flown into Reagan National Airport in Washington DC, your plane followed the course of the Potomac River and past two places with special significance to aviation history in the nation’s capital. Aviation commentator Paul Glenshaw takes us there.

Andrew Fogg / Flickr Creative Commons

Poor Will’s Almanack for the very edge of middle spring, in the second week of the Cabbage White Butterfly Moon, the first full week of the sun in Aries, the seventeenth week of the new year in nature.

Martin LeBar / Flickr Creative Commons

The first stage in the progress of spring brings the sighting of “firsts”: first bluebird, first robin, red-winged blackbird, first crocus, first daffodil, first tulip and so forth.

Now with as middle spring approaches, quantity matters as much as novelty.

Firsts are easy now: first hepatica, first violet cress, first Dutchman’s breeches, first twinleaf, first spring beauty, first lungwort, first bluebell, first cabbage white butterfly.

And the discovery of firsts lasts as long as a person might look or listen.

A celebration for the Do It Yourself day is  Saturday, at WBI Tec^Edge Innovation and Collaboration Center. It is to bring together various maker groups/businesses and to encourage exploration and tinkering as a path to innovation and to inspire future generations to become interested in STEM. This event is free and open to the community. All ages are welcome.

Julie Falk / Flickr Creative Commons

More and more things are happening, the plot of the story of March becoming more and more apparent as the month comes toward its climax.

Bright aconites and snowdrops and snow crocus have reached full bloom. Hyacinths and daffodils and tulips and pushkinia are inching up, sometimes budding, sometimes opening in the sun.

Tonight in downtown Dayton is First Friday…5 to 10 p.m.  Check out activities at downtown’s art galleries, local retailers, food specials  and shows.  On your Facebook check out First Friday: March Madness Edition

Martin Kenny / Flickr Creative Commons

Bluebell growing season begins as its first dusky foliage emerges from the hillsides. Daffodil, chickweed, purple deadnettle, and dandelion blooming times unfold slowly just as clumps of nettles, shepherd’s purse, cress, clover and lamb’s quarters reach the spring tipping point and spill across the waysides, fields and gardens.

courtesy of Dayton History

Tomorrow, on Saturday, at 9:00am there is a slow-paced walk through the Woodland Cemetery and Arboretum. This is home to many diverse species of birds and the bare trees make it easy for viewing. Don't forget your camera and binoculars!

The Junior Leaguers Club of Dayton is sponsoring a special screening of DEAR WHITE PEOPLE on Saturday at noon at The Neon. This is a 2014 American satirical film that focuses on African American students who attend a predominately white university.

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