WYSO

Commentary

A dinner, screening and discussion of an award winning film, "The Human Face of Climate Change," is on tonight, 5-8pm at Christ Episcopal Church, in downtown Dayton. Come, learn and articulate solutions for a problem that is not limited to the Third World. No admission charge for the event…"love offerings" gratefully accepted.

On Saturday at 10:30 am. at the Sunwatch Indian Village there will be a presentation about “Tracking down the Homes of the Mound Builders.”

Scott W / Flickr Creative Commons

The tracking of leafturn and leaf fall from specific trees throughout the autumn offers a semblance of control to the tracker. And an annual record of the gradual transformation and shedding of those trees, often reveals the character of an entire year.

Like counting fallen leaves, however, the practice of recording the progress of autumn with such landmarks may be simply an exercise in fantasy, a comforting pretense of lay scientific observation, as though the state of Mr. Danielson’s beech or Lil’s maple really mattered.

Remembering Selma, Honoring Black History Year-Round

Feb 15, 2015
Kimberly Barrett is Wright State University’s Vice President For Multicultural Affairs and Community Engagement.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Black History Month has always created a bit of a quandary for me. I hope that one day stories of the contributions of Americans of African descent are so woven into the intergenerational narrative we share in the United States that there will be no need for it. However, this year the celebration of Black History Month is especially momentous. It coincides with the 50th anniversary of events leading to a pivotal moment in the evolution of our nation’s democracy, the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Jen Goellnitz

The Great Backyard Bird Count is this weekend. Bird watchers of all ages count birds to create a real-time snapshot of bird populations. You'll be asked to count birds for as little as 15 minutes on one or more days and report your sightings online. Anyone can take part, from beginning bird watchers to experts!

jasmic / Flickr Creative Commons

When I am restless in the winter, the landscape around me doesn't seem enough. These few acres of woods and homes are just a taste, only a promise of the great world.

But when I go too far away, I gather my landmarks of home around me. Distant locations only make sense against my private gauge.

Time benefits from a master point like Greenwich; from that arbitrary set point, we can know the sun throughout the world, and even plot the instant and the physical place where the past and future blend to a single day, balance in a temporal vacuum.

After 150 Years, Black Struggles Echo An Earlier Voice

Feb 9, 2015
Henry Highland Garnet, abolitionist pastor and advocate, spoke on the U.S. capitol in February, 1865.
Wikimedia Commons

A hundred and fifty years ago this week, Reverend Henry Highland Garnet became the first Black man to present from the speaker’s platform in the U.S. capital. He preached to commemorate the January 31st passage by Congress of the Thirteenth Amendment, which abolished slavery. In the sermon, Garnet compared Christians who supported slavery to the biblical Pharisees who observed many rituals, but whose cruelty  demonstrated that they did not have a true love for their fellow men in their hearts.

Today is First Friday, and that means it starts with a bang in downtown Dayton. There is a free art hop featuring exhibit openings at the galleries, along with a variety of entertainment options, arts, demonstrations, live music and more.

Beautiful organ music will be the theme for Organic Masterpieces, on Saturday and Sunday at 3pm, at Shiloh Church. They will perform several choral works written for the organ, along with several others in the a cappella tradition.

Blossom Vydrina / Flickr Creative Commons

The seasonal clock has advanced by the span of three moons since the last leaves fell to the ground. The first weeds and wildflowers of 2015 were already rising slowly through November and December: hemlock, lamium, garlic mustard, creeping Charlie, sweet rockets, sweet Cicely, dock, skunk cabbage, wood mint, watercress, mouse-eared chickweed. And now, the tips of snowdrops and snow crocus and daffodils have emerged.

An evening-length contemporary dance theater takes a sneak peek into the lives of various lovers, whose relationships collide and intersect throughout the span of one evening in a quaint but moody nightclub. Emotions are stirred. Hearts break. Hearts mend. This is Saturday, 7:30pm at the Victoria Theatre.

Gabrielle Civil in a previous performance entitled "And then..." at Antioch College.
Dennie Eagleson

WYSO is planning a series of commentaries in the coming weeks from local professors and leaders in the black community, in honor of Black History Month in February. To kick it off, Antioch College Associate Professor of Performance Gabrielle Civil is on air Friday morning, Jan. 30, to preview upcoming events at Antioch College.

Civil is holding a story circle in collaboration with Coretta Scott King Center director Mila Cooper. Details provided by Antioch College are below; information about other events will be added as they become available. 

Pages