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Marigolds

May 3, 2015
Grant Guarino / Flickr Creative Commons

This year WYSO and Tecumseh Land Trust sponsored Living on the Land, an essay contest inviting writers of all ages to reflect on what home and land mean to them.  Yellow Springs resident Abigail Cobb won honorable mention in the adult category.

Living On the (Is)land—Nettle and Jewelweed

May 3, 2015
Stephen Shellard / Flickr Creative Commons

This year WYSO and Tecumseh Land Trust sponsored Living on the Land, an essay contest inviting writers of all ages to reflect on what home and land mean to them.  Enon resident Maggie Yowler won honorable mention in the adult category.

Lying on the Land

May 3, 2015
Trees and sky
Philippa Willitts / Flickr Creative Commons

This year WYSO and Tecumseh Land Trust sponsored Living on the Land, an essay contest inviting writers of all ages to reflect on what home and land mean to them.  This week, we hear from Yellow Springs resident Lori Gravley.  Her essay won the grand prize in the adult category and is entitled, "Lying on the Land."

Today is May Day which is an ancient Northern Hemisphere spring festival and a traditional spring holiday in many cultures. Dances, singing, and cake are usually part of the celebration of May Day!

9th Air Force P-47 Thunderbolts
Dan Patterson

Friday, May 8th is recognized as VE Day, which stands for Victory in Europe. 70 years ago, in the spring of 1945, American armies were streaming across Europe – the war was nearly over.  Part of the Americans' success came because they had learned how to support the troops and tanks on the ground with support with from the air.

Military flying began in 1914, in the early days of WWI as a way to see over the horizon and figure out what the enemy was up to.  Soon military flying became a sophisticated tactical and strategic weapon in itself.

Mr.TinDC / Flickr Creative Commons

The week ducklings and goslings hatch on the shore of rivers and lakes, the week daddy longlegs crawl up into the undergrowth and orchard petals blow away as the moon turns full. It is the week that northern spring field crickets, the first singing crickets of the year, begin to sing.

Golden seal, sedum, golden Alexander, and Solomon's seal seasons show in the deep woods. Peony buds are an inch across. Orange poppies flower, and ruby-throated hummingbirds reach syrup feeders.

What does it truly mean to be a patriot? This evocative and heart-warming play puts the soldier experience front and center by bringing to life on stage actual letters written home during the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. This underlines the belief that the person standing beside you is more important than you are. This play is tonight at The Victoria Theatre.

Kristy Johnson / Flickr Creative Commons

The end of middle spring calls out bumblebees and carpenter bees all along the 40th Parallel. American toads keep on mating, and tadpoles already swim in the backwaters. Mosquitoes bite, and new hummingbird moths come out to sip the annual mass flowering of dandelions.

Garden Station's EarthFest 2015 is leading the way to Go a Shade Greener on Saturday from 10 AM until 7 PM. Bring your whole family and join your neighbors in an Earth Week celebration of a healthier and more sustainable way of living.

If you want to hear about the historic and prehistoric properties at Wright Patt Air Force Base then on Saturday, 10:30am at SunWatch Indian Village some Air Force cultural specialists will provide an overview of this.

Liz West / Flickr Creative Commons

In the time of autumn recollection, the absence of spring and summer sometimes leads to melancholy, a nostalgia for things that have disappeared. Decay is a reminder of the brevity of fulfillment. Past time may seem like betrayal or like illusion. The the falling of fruit and foliage seems to be a terminal condition that only leads to a cold conclusion void of color.

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