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Commentary

autumn leaves
Heliosphere / Flickr Creative Commons

When autumn leafturn starts near equinox in the Midwest, the deciduous trees are bare in northern Canada.  In Oregon and Maine, foliage colors are approaching their best. In the Rocky Mountains, bull elks are mustering their harems, and snow is falling.  Along the 40th parallel, the smoky tint of last week’s canopy quickly becomes clear and bright.

Commentary: Economic De-segregation In The Miami Valley

Sep 18, 2017
school desks
Historic Breman / Flickr Creative Commons

Last summer, a nonprofit called EdBuild examined child poverty rate disparities between neighboring school districts. They then ranked neighboring school districts from largest to smallest disparities. Of the top ten largest disparities in the US, two of them were in the Miami Valley. Danielle Rhubart is a lecturer and sociologist at University of Dayton. She studies poverty in urban and rural communities and brings us this commentary - about why poverty disparity matters and how to fix it.

A longtime fixture of the Dayton food truck scene, Katie Marks of The Wicked 'Wich of Dayton, will be closing at the end of this season to deal with recently discovered serious health concerns. The Yellow Cab and all of the trucks for the Friday, 5-10pm monthly rally will be participating by donating some money from every sandwich for her medical bills.

fall sky
Per / Flickr Creative Commons

Fall doesn't come all at once with equinox; it's been coming since the 26th of June when the days started to grow longer again, the Northern Hemisphere tilting away from its source of heat.

The sun rose from the east northeast and set west northwest three months ago; now it rises almost due east, sets due west. Dawn and dusk continue to move south at the rate of about one degree every 72 hours until December solstice.

At Rosewood Arts Center you connect with other artists, be part of the maker's community, and pick-up some supplies! Come by the Maker's Market and shop while networking! Various items including painting, scrapbooking, sewing, sculpting supplies, and more! Saturday, 10am - 2pm.

Cam Miller / Flickr Creative Commons

In this fifth week of late summer, the final tier of wildflowers starts to open.  White and violet asters, orange beggarticks, burr marigolds, tall goldenrod, zigzag goldenrod and Japanese knotweed come into bloom, blending with the brightest of the purple ironweed, yellow sundrops, blue chicory, golden touch-me-nots, showy coneflowers and great blue lobelia.

As the city slips out of summer and into fall, there's no better way to kick off the long weekend than with First Friday activities throughout downtown Dayton! Discover a new artist at a gallery opening; kick back with food and drink specials at a bar or restaurant; groove to a local band playing at a nearby pub and many other things to do. Whatever mood strikes, downtown's growing number of independent businesses are ready to serve a proper summer send-off. This starts tonight at 5pm.

cricket
Nicolas Winspeare / Flickr Creative Commons

In matters of global economics, the concepts of millions and billions and trillions seem disconnected from day-to-day budgeting. Who knows, I wonder, what all those zeros at the end of whole numbers really mean

As I watch the season progress, I realize that my sense of numbers in the world around me is equally as confused. In the middle of May, the hundred days of summer feel like a zillion days to me. My body senses a limitless promise in that span of time.

On Saturday at St. Anne's Hill Historic District you can stroll the neighborhood and hear local music at the first of what will be an annual festival celebrating the quality and diversity of the Dayton music scene. It starts at 3:30 PM…And at 4pm at 1436 East 4th Street you can hear two accordion guys playing on the porch.

On your facebook go to DaytonPorchfest

monarch butterfly
Peter Miller / Flickr Creative Commons

I settled in to watch like I used to do when I went fishing. I used to sit for hours then,  focused on my bobber and fingering the tension on my line. The bites or strikes were signs that I had understood something of the river’s mystery and its creatures.

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