Climate Change

Sen. Brown Defends His No Vote On Keystone XL

Nov 20, 2014
Sherrod Brown
WCPN

Ohio U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown is defending his vote against the Keystone X-L pipeline Tuesday. The move to fast-track the pipeline’s construction was shy one vote in the Senate, with strong support from Republicans and a few Democrats.

Brown says if the Keystone Pipeline project is approved and built, it would divert tar sand crude away from Midwestern refineries, a costly move for consumers.

The United States, China, Ohio and Climate Change

Nov 14, 2014
Han Jun Zeng / Flickr Creative Commons

The United States, China and Ohio might seem like an unlikely grouping, but that’s how University of Dayton professor Bob Brecha is making sense of the climate change agreement made during the President’s visit to China this week.

Science now tells us that climate change is real. We are witnessing the effects around the world, from heat waves to extreme rain and snow. Although we’ve been working on international climate agreements for decades, very little has been accomplished.

Rising Sea Levels

Oct 30, 2014
go_greener_oz / Flickr Creative Commons

Should we be thinking about reserving spots for our great-grandchildren on glass-bottom boat tours of New Orleans and Manhattan? How much could sea-levels rise, and when? Could it reach Ohio? University of Dayton professor Bob Brecha takes a look at the extreme possibilities of sea-level rise in the future.

Tech Companies Breaking Up With ALEC Over Climate Change

Oct 13, 2014
A Paulding County wind farm. Ohio Republicans connected to ALEC sponsored a bill to roll back the state's renewable energy standards.
David Grant / Flickr/Creative Commons

Many big tech companies are breaking up with the national organization ALEC, or the American Legislative Exchange Council. ALEC is a group geared towards crafting free-market-based model legislation that’s introduced into state legislatures, usually by conservative Republicans—and Ohio is now caught in the middle of the dispute.

Austin Rinebolt-Miller

A group of Antioch College students got back Monday morning from the People’s Climate March in New York City. The march was expected to be the largest and most diverse in history at over 100,000 people. Now organizers are pegging the count at at least 310,000.

Several dozen Antioch students and several hundred Ohioans had planned to attend the march on buses. Antioch students hoped to bring back new energy about fighting global climate change.

Demonstrators at the 2010 Cancun Climate Summit.
Velcrow Ripper / Flickr/Creative Commons

Hundreds of Ohio residents, including a large group from Antioch College, will get on buses, trains and take carpools to New York City this weekend for the People’s Climate March on Sunday, September 21.

The People’s Climate March is being billed as the first of its kind and the largest climate march ever; it’s a protest against global climate change just as the United Nations convenes a climate summit.

The Great Miami River is connected to the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, where Dayton gets its water.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Human-caused climate change is expected to have devastating effects across the country and world. The Midwest is somewhat insulated from extremes of drought or rising seas, but a recent report finds Ohio could see costly effects ranging from flooding to dangerous extreme heat spells by the end of the century.

A bill that would put a hold on Ohio’s energy efficiency and renewable standards is making its way through the state legislature after late-night passage in the state senate last Thursday. While opponents of the 2008 standards say they are costly for consumers, some are arguing the current standards are good for business and save money in the long run.

The Great Miami River is connected to the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, where Dayton gets its water.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Scientists around the country are ringing alarm bells about climate change, and some of the effects are already hitting the Dayton area. A local study of attitudes on climate change finds many people are concerned, but it also finds people are not sure what to do about climate change nor confident that it will be addressed.

New Ways of Thinking

May 6, 2014
Mike Baker / Flickr Creative Commons

When thinking about how much we are willing to do to prevent climate change, University of Dayton professor Bob Brecha wonders if we worry too much about economics alone.

Questions and comments often come up when I start talking about renewable energy. They go something like this: “I would like to install solar panels, but the payback time is just too long.” Or, when I bought a hybrid car ten years ago, friends said, “That’s nice, but how long will it take for gas savings to make up for the extra cost?”

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