civil rights

The Andrew Goodman Foundation

When James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner went to Mississippi in 1964 to register black voters, it’s likely they were unaware of the danger they faced.

Remembering Civil Rights Advocate Anne Braden

Aug 27, 2014
Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research, University of Louisville

Americans are grappling again with issues of social justice and racial equality, in light of the shooting of an unarmed black teenager named Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. And here in the Miami Valley the same issues are in the headlines, since John Crawford III was shot by police in a Beavercreek Walmart store on August 5.

 In 1962, with funds provided by the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), Charlie Cobb boarded a bus in Washington D.C and headed to Houston, Texas to attend a civil rights workshop. At a stopover in Jackson, Mississippi, he contacted the local Student Non Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) group. Activist Lawrence Guyot persuaded him to stay and contribute to the organizing efforts already underway. Five years on the ground in Mississippi between 1962 and 1967 gave Cobb a perspective few historians have.

Andrew Goodman was a young man from New York who went to Mississippi during the summer of 1964 to participate in the civil rights struggles that were taking place then in the South. Shortly after he arrived he vanished. Andrew and two other civil rights workers had been taken by members of the Ku Klux Klan and brutally murdered. Their bodies were found some time later.

50 years ago this month, volunteers from across the country came to Oxford, Ohio to prepare for a pivotal event in the civil rights movement. Dave Barber created this story for WYSO'S Community Voices. 

“We hope to send into Mississippi this summer upwards of 1000 teachers, ministers and students from all around the country who will engage in what are we calling freedom schools, community center programs, voter registration activities, in general a program designed to open Mississippi to the country.”    Bob Moses  1964     

Call and Response is an African American produced show about the Miami Valley. It is a program that stimulates and engages the core WYSO audience while speaking especially to listeners of color. Call and Response is an opportunity to share in the collective history of the multicultural community we call home.

Host Daryl Ward is one of the most recognizable voices and community leaders in Southwest Ohio. Dr. Ward lives and works in West Dayton, where he serves as pastor of the Omega Baptist Church in Dayton View.

courtesy of Mad River Theater Works

At the start of the summer of 1947, television was brand new, the sound barrier had not been broken, and baseball was a white man’s game. By the time the fall arrived, all that had changed. President Truman addressed the nation for the first time on TV, Chuck Yeager flew faster than any man ever had, and Jackie Robinson became the first African-American to play major league baseball. 

courtesy of Antiochiana, Antioch College

The controversy began in 1960 at the Gegner Barber Shop located in Yellow Springs, Ohio. The owner, Lewis Gegner, claimed “I don’t know how to cut their (Negro’s) hair” and refused to provide service to African Americans.

By 1960, the Antioch Committee for Racial Equality (ACRE) and the Antioch Chapter of the NAACP were successful in desegregating other businesses in the Village of Yellow Springs. But Gegner refused even after being fined for violating the local anti-discrimination ordinance.

We Have a Dream

Aug 28, 2013

I was only 2 years old in August of 1963, when those 250 thousand people converged on Washington.  They traveled by car and train and chartered bus.  Some just walked or hitchhiked.  They came from all over the country.

Early in the day, at the Washington Monument, Bob Dylan and Joan Baez lead the crowds in singing "We Shall Overcome," and they proceeded to march peacefully to the foot of the Lincoln Memorial for more music and speeches.  Mahalia Jackson sang, as she often did at Dr. King's request, and then Dr. King came to the podium.

The Cincinnati Museum Center and the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center are merging in an effort to prevent the civil rights institution from closing its doors.

The Cincinnati Enquirer reports that the merger will allow the Freedom Center to close a $1.5 million annual budget hole and the Museum Center to increase efforts to pay $8 million debt.  About 15 jobs will be eliminated.

The Museum Center houses a history museum, a children's museum and a natural history and a science museum.  The Freedom Center will be its fourth wholly owned subsidiary.

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