WYSO

civil rights

Longtown's restoration is underway.
Jerry Kenney

In southwest Ohio, about a mile from the Indiana state line, a long-forgotten town with a special place in African American history is struggling to be reborn.

Longtown was established nearly 200 years ago in what is now Greenville. The settlement grew into a thriving mixed-race community and a major stop on the Underground Railroad.

Now, descendants of those pioneering settlers are working to bring Longtown back to life for others to experience.

Longtown’s History

Dayton City Commissioner Dean Lovelace served six terms and holds the record as the city's longest serving commissioner.
City of Dayton Facebook Page

Many in the Dayton area have been paying tribute to longtime city commissioner Dean Lovelace. Lovelace died Sunday, more than a year after vacating the seat he held for six terms. He was 70 years old.  

Lovelace was seen by many in Dayton politics as a champion for poor and disadvantaged communities throughout his two decades in office. He advocated for a host of economic issues, including fair housing, financial literacy, the earned income tax program and free tax-preparation services.

On Thursday, November 12th, four honorees will be celebrated for their work to protect the rights of low-income and disadvantaged people living in the Miami Valley. It will take place at the Access To Justice Awards ceremony at the Sinclair Community College Ponitz Center.

After 150 Years, Black Struggles Echo An Earlier Voice

Feb 9, 2015
Henry Highland Garnet, abolitionist pastor and advocate, spoke on the U.S. capitol in February, 1865.
Wikimedia Commons

A hundred and fifty years ago this week, Reverend Henry Highland Garnet became the first Black man to present from the speaker’s platform in the U.S. capital. He preached to commemorate the January 31st passage by Congress of the Thirteenth Amendment, which abolished slavery. In the sermon, Garnet compared Christians who supported slavery to the biblical Pharisees who observed many rituals, but whose cruelty  demonstrated that they did not have a true love for their fellow men in their hearts.

courtesy of Antiochiana / Antioch College

Almost 50 years ago, the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. came to Yellow Springs and Antioch College to address the graduates at his wife Coretta’s alma mater. WYSO News was there to cover the event, and this tape is one of the most significant recordings in the WYSO Archives.

Martin Luther King's 1965 commencement speech at Antioch College
courtesy of Antiochiana

Thursday, January 15, 2015

The Dayton Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center MLK Breakfast & Program

9:00 a.m.

Speaker: Rev. Leon Wilkinson, Mt. Zion Baptist Church, Middletown, OH and Chaplain/Teacher, MonDay Community Correctional Institution, Dayton, OH

Donation: $10

Ticket Information:  Cheryl Dixon, 937-268-6511, ext. 2353

Location:  Dayton Veterans Center, Bldg. 305, 4100 W. Third Street Dayton, OH 45428

The Andrew Goodman Foundation

When James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner went to Mississippi in 1964 to register black voters, it’s likely they were unaware of the danger they faced.

Remembering Civil Rights Advocate Anne Braden

Aug 27, 2014
Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research, University of Louisville

Americans are grappling again with issues of social justice and racial equality, in light of the shooting of an unarmed black teenager named Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. And here in the Miami Valley the same issues are in the headlines, since John Crawford III was shot by police in a Beavercreek Walmart store on August 5.

 In 1962, with funds provided by the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), Charlie Cobb boarded a bus in Washington D.C and headed to Houston, Texas to attend a civil rights workshop. At a stopover in Jackson, Mississippi, he contacted the local Student Non Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) group. Activist Lawrence Guyot persuaded him to stay and contribute to the organizing efforts already underway. Five years on the ground in Mississippi between 1962 and 1967 gave Cobb a perspective few historians have.

Andrew Goodman was a young man from New York who went to Mississippi during the summer of 1964 to participate in the civil rights struggles that were taking place then in the South. Shortly after he arrived he vanished. Andrew and two other civil rights workers had been taken by members of the Ku Klux Klan and brutally murdered. Their bodies were found some time later.

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