City of Dayton

The race track at the north Dayton racino under construction in 2014. Racino owner Penn National can't agree with the state of Ohio on a relocation payment to the city of Dayton.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The mayor of Dayton says the state needs to act soon to get the city a $500,000 racino payment it’s owed by law. The money got hung up at the very end of the recent lame-duck session, when Governor John Kasich vetoed a line-item amendment to a bill that resolved a long-standing dispute over the money.

No 'Typical Day' For Dayton City Manager

Nov 28, 2014
Dayton city officials are searching for a new city manager. Current manager Tim Riordan announced his resignation this fall.
City of Dayton Website: Jim Witmer/Dayton Daily News

Dayton is searching for a new city manager, and taking public input this month on what residents want from a manager. This job, unlike the mayor, isn’t an elected position.

So what exactly does a city manager do?

Current manager Tim Riordan is basically Dayton’s chief executive. Elected officials—mainly the city commissioners—mull over proposals, pass them and then task Riordan with actually carrying them out. But he also lobbies lawmakers in the statehouse and takes part in union negotiations. And he says that’s not all.

 

City of Dayton Working On 2015 Budget

Nov 25, 2014
Dayton's officials are coming up against some unknowns in the budget process for next year.
Derek Jensen

The City of Dayton is starting its budget process for next year. Officials will be dipping into savings again to balance the spending plan.

 

It will cost about $160 million to run Dayton in 2015. That money comes from a variety of sources: income taxes, property taxes and casino revenue. But this year the city will also use $2.5 million in reserves.

Kevin Jones with the Fair River Oaks Priority Board spoke in front of nearly 100 people at a public town hall meeting on Dayton's source water protection program.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

More than 25 people out of nearly a hundred in attendance took the mike at a town hall meeting about Dayton’s drinking water protections Monday evening.

City Of Dayton Wants Input For City Manager Search

Nov 17, 2014
Dayton city officials are searching for a new city manager. Current manager Tim Riordan announced his resignation this fall.
City of Dayton Website: Jim Witmer/Dayton Daily News

Residents in the Greater Dayton area can provide input about what they want in the next Dayton city manager. Current manager Tim Riordan is leaving his post Jan. 31.

The city commission is taking public comment online through Friday Nov. 21.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley calls the city the “region’s leader.” So she figures people living outside of Dayton proper should speak their piece, too.

An image of the revised source water protection policy map for the city of Dayton's wellfields.
City of Dayton

The city of Dayton has released new proposed changes to its drinking water protections following a series of public meetings and meetings with stakeholders over the last six months. Water Department Director Tammi Clements presented an outline of the latest proposals to the Dayton City Commission Wednesday morning.

Dayton Citizens' Water Brigade To Hold Teach-In

Oct 4, 2014
Signs around the Miami Valley demarcate the boundaries of the well fields and source water protection areas.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

 A new group called the Dayton Citizens’ Water Brigade is holding a teach-in tonight about the City of Dayton’s water protection policy.

The group opposes changes to the policy that’s been in place for over 25 years. The policy was created as an attempt to keep hazardous chemicals away from the wellfields that supply water to 400,000 people around Dayton, including most Montgomery County suburbs. It forbids new chemicals within a set geographic area, and provides incentives for companies to reduce chemical storage already in place through a buy-back program.

The commissioners of Montgomery County and the City of Dayton say they have identified several projects they’ll be able to work on together. The commissioners say the collaborative efforts, tagged as the Dayton/Montgomery County Compact, will save taxpayer dollars and improve services.

In a statement Wednesday, County Commission President Dan Foley said the city and county are “committed to better serving its citizens.” Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley said partnerships are essential for improving city and county operations.

The Great Miami River is connected to the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, where Dayton gets its water.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The City of Dayton water department says it’s considering feedback from the public and businesses on a proposal to change the city’s drinking water protections.

The city’s water system, which serves 400,000 people including customers in Kettering, Vandalia, Riverside, Trotwood and Brookville, pumps water from two industrial parts of Dayton. Since the late 80s, city zoning laws have limited the hazardous chemicals companies can have in those areas.

The credit rating agency – Standard and Poors – has upgraded the city of Dayton’s credit rating.  It’s a move that bodes well for the city, which has faced serious economic challenges in the last couple of years. 

Dayton City Manager Tim Riordan called the upgrade a  “huge achievement for the City.”

The upgrade doesn’t mean the city is “flush with cash,” according to Riordan, but the report indicates that the city of Dayton is “managing its resources well.” 

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