City of Dayton

Miller Valentine

Developer Miller Valentine has released plans for the redevelopment of the 38-acre Montgomery County fairgrounds. The current site of the Montgomery County Fair could become a mixed-use development that resembles The Greene in Beavercreek. 

Dayton's new "Midtown District" would be 60% residential and 40% commercial, including at least one hotel, several restaurants and other retailers, and a 35,000-sq.-ft. grocery store.

Ohio counties now have extra time to demolish and clean up thousands of vacant and nuisance properties after the attorney general’s office extended a deadline to use up demolition grant funds.

Jerry Kenney

Dayton’s Oregon Historic District has a controversial aspect to it: the sound of the word. Unlike the state of Oregon, the end of which is pronounced like “begin", the proper noun used by Daytonians is pronounced Oregon—with an ending that rhymes with John. Dayton resident Jesse Clark asked WYSO Curious—why?

Why is it called the OreGON District? Why don’t we pronounce it the same way people do in Oregon state?

Jesse says he’s been trying to answer the question for quite some time.

GM's Moraine assembly was once an iconic Dayton-area employer. A Chinese auto-glass company will soon take over the building, but the city of Moraine is still short thousands of jobs.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

A few income tax increases and levies for operating expenses went before Miami Valley voters in yesterday’s primary election, and preliminary results show voters largely said yes to raising municipal taxes.

mayor nan whaley
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Dayton voters will be asked to renew a .5 percent increase to the city’s income tax on Tuesday’s primary ballot.

Dayton’s income tax is currently 2.25 percent, but the permanent rate is 1.75 percent—the last half a percent has always been temporary. Voters have renewed it overwhelmingly four times since it was first passed in 1984.

City officials hope to cut the costs of bringing the tax to a vote in the future by asking voters to pass the increase with no time limit.

mayor nan whaley
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley kept her focus on jobs and education at her first State of the City speech Tuesday.

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the Beatles coming to the U.S., Mayor Whaley started by channeling the Fab Four to sum up the state of the city.

“I could try to convince you that everything in Dayton is 'ob-la-di, ob-la-da' if we could just ‘let it be,’” she said. “But my commission colleagues would probably tell me—you can’t do that.”

Wikimedia Commons

As the Miami Valley continues to get pummeled with winter storms, the near-record amount of snow and ice creates multiple problems for public works departments.

“We’ve been pretty much doing winter since the middle of November, and every other week we’ve been dealing with a snow, or snow and ice event,” said Fred Stovall, Dayton’s Public Works director.

Logo / Dayton Regional Green

The City of Dayton and Montgomery County moved this week to sign resolutions to make the region more “green” in the coming years. Leaders are encouraging businesses to take on basic environmental practices, and asking individuals to do more recycling and energy conservation.

The city and county’s goals for the Dayton Regional Green Initiative include certifying 1,500 companies as “green,” and planting 100,000 trees by 2016. They also want 25 percent of the region’s waste to be recycled.

 Voters passed electric aggregation in Xenia Tuesday by a margin of around 9 percent, and Dayton's ballot issue squeezed through with just a .51 percent margin in favor.

Montgomery County Board of Elections Director Jan Kelly says a final count will be complete Nov. 26, and official results including any recounts will be issued Dec. 6. Because the Dayton's aggregation proposal won by just 75 votes in the "official unofficial" tally (7,318 in favor and 7,243 against), it's still possible the final count could go the other way.

Jerry Kenney / WYSO

A city commissioner has defeated a former judge to win the election as Dayton's next mayor in the nonpartisan race. Nan Whaley won about 56 percent of the vote to defeat A.J. Wagner in unofficial returns Tuesday with 100 percent of precincts reporting.

Whaley had 9,091 votes to Wagner's 7,029 votes, or nearly 44 percent. 

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