City of Dayton

The credit rating agency – Standard and Poors – has upgraded the city of Dayton’s credit rating.  It’s a move that bodes well for the city, which has faced serious economic challenges in the last couple of years. 

Dayton City Manager Tim Riordan called the upgrade a  “huge achievement for the City.”

The upgrade doesn’t mean the city is “flush with cash,” according to Riordan, but the report indicates that the city of Dayton is “managing its resources well.” 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — State school board members in Ohio say they are shocked at accounts of sex games, test tampering and other potentially criminal acts at a Dayton charter school, and they plan to investigate. Horizon Science Academy of Dayton is one of 19 affiliated schools in Ohio that have been associated with an influential U.S.-based Muslim cleric, Fethullah Gulen. The FBI is investigating three of the Ohio schools.

Jeffrey Simmons speaks to representatives from the City of Dayton water department.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

About 20 people spoke out at a public meeting Monday on Dayton’s proposal to revise its drinking water protections. Almost all the speakers opposed the plan, which would reduce the most stringently protected area by 40 percent.

Signs around the Miami Valley demarcate the boundaries of the well fields and source water protection areas.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The first of two public hearings is taking place Monday, July 14 on possible changes to Dayton’s drinking water protection program. Drinking water for more than 400,000 people in Montgomery and parts of Greene County comes from two wellfields that tap into the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, a shallow sand and gravel aquifer that is vulnerable to contamination from surface spills.

Miller Valentine

Developer Miller Valentine has released plans for the redevelopment of the 38-acre Montgomery County fairgrounds. The current site of the Montgomery County Fair could become a mixed-use development that resembles The Greene in Beavercreek. 

Dayton's new "Midtown District" would be 60% residential and 40% commercial, including at least one hotel, several restaurants and other retailers, and a 35,000-sq.-ft. grocery store.

Ohio counties now have extra time to demolish and clean up thousands of vacant and nuisance properties after the attorney general’s office extended a deadline to use up demolition grant funds.

Dayton's Oregon District
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Dayton’s Oregon Historic District has a controversial aspect to it: the sound of the word. Unlike the state of Oregon, the end of which is pronounced like “begin", the proper noun used by Daytonians is pronounced Oregon—with an ending that rhymes with John. Dayton resident Jesse Clark asked WYSO Curious—why?

Why is it called the OreGON District? Why don’t we pronounce it the same way people do in Oregon state?

Jesse says he’s been trying to answer the question for quite some time.

GM's Moraine assembly was once an iconic Dayton-area employer. A Chinese auto-glass company will soon take over the building, but the city of Moraine is still short thousands of jobs.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

A few income tax increases and levies for operating expenses went before Miami Valley voters in yesterday’s primary election, and preliminary results show voters largely said yes to raising municipal taxes.

mayor nan whaley
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Dayton voters will be asked to renew a .5 percent increase to the city’s income tax on Tuesday’s primary ballot.

Dayton’s income tax is currently 2.25 percent, but the permanent rate is 1.75 percent—the last half a percent has always been temporary. Voters have renewed it overwhelmingly four times since it was first passed in 1984.

City officials hope to cut the costs of bringing the tax to a vote in the future by asking voters to pass the increase with no time limit.

mayor nan whaley
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley kept her focus on jobs and education at her first State of the City speech Tuesday.

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the Beatles coming to the U.S., Mayor Whaley started by channeling the Fab Four to sum up the state of the city.

“I could try to convince you that everything in Dayton is 'ob-la-di, ob-la-da' if we could just ‘let it be,’” she said. “But my commission colleagues would probably tell me—you can’t do that.”

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