City of Dayton

Dayton City Manager, Shelley Dickstein
City of Dayton

The City of Dayton has appointed a new city manager. Shelley Dickstein has been acting as interim city manager since Warren Price stepped down last September.

 

  Dickstein will take over the position permanently on Wednesday. She’s worked for the city of Dayton since 1996 and has most recently served as assistant city manager.

 

City of Dayton

Beginning Monday, January 11th, the Webster Street Bridge in downtown Dayton will be shut down.

The city of Dayton says it’s tearing down the 100-year-old structure and will replace it with a new one at a cost of more than $10 million dollars.

The city issued a statement saying demolition and construction of the new bridge is expected to be complete by November 2017 and it will feature “wider sidewalks, enhanced lighting and observation plazas.”

In the meantime, Monument Avenue and Keowee Streets will serve as alternate routes for motorists.

Dayton police say response times depend on call volume and the priority level of the call.  dayton police car
Carey Scheer / WYSO

Akron has been rated the best city in the nation when it comes to return-on-investment on spending for police, with Dayton coming in second.  

The calculations of the personal finance site WalletHub compare tax dollars spent per capita for police protection to crime rates, with adjustments made for poverty and unemployment rates and household income. By those calculations, three Ohio cities come out in the top 10 – with Akron ranked first, Dayton second and Cleveland seventh.

Montgomery County Commissioner Dan Foley (left) and Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce President Phil Parker spoke at a Thursday event re-launching the effort to merge city and county government.
Carey Scheer / WYSO

An effort to consolidate Montgomery County and Dayton city governments is facing resistance just as it gets off the ground. The idea is to imitate Louisville, Kentucky, which consolidated with its surrounding county in 2003. Proponents argue a merger would make Dayton larger and more powerful, and reduce competition for economic development between cities and towns.

Stop Mass Incarceration Rally Held In Dayton

Apr 14, 2015
Wayne Baker / WYSO

A nationwide protest against mass incarceration came to Dayton Tuesday. It was one of about 30 rallies organized by the Stop Mass Incarceration Network.

More than 75 protesters showed up at Courthouse Square in downtown Dayton, and marched three city blocks holding signs and chanting. The group stopped traffic for a few minutes doing a die-in in front of the courthouse.
 

Anthony Roebuck, 23, helped organize the local rally.

One of the largest employers in Clark County is eliminating 120 jobs from its workforce. Assurant is cutting 87 jobs from its Springfield location and 33 jobs from its Dayton office.
 

New York-based Assurant, an insurance company formerly known as Fortis, employs more than 2,000 people in Springfield and Dayton. The company has already eliminated more than 100 jobs in the past nine months.

Study: Dayton Area Residents Living Further From Jobs

Mar 26, 2015
I-75 north of Cincinnati. Many in the Dayton area are living further from jobs than they did in the year 2000.   highway
Travis Estell / Flickr/Creative Commons

Dayton ranks among the worst in the country in a Brookings Institution study that finds many people in metro areas are living further away from jobs.

Dayton Makes A U-Turn On Traffic Camera Ban

Mar 23, 2015
traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

The city of Dayton has discontinued, then reinstated, its use of traffic cameras.

Monday was the first day of a state law effectively banning the use of static red light and speed cameras to ticket drivers. The law requires a police officer to be present in order for a ticket to be issued based on a violation caught on camera.

But several cities, including Akron, Springfield, Dayton and Toledo filed lawsuits against the state, saying the law violated the cities’ home rule authority.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley talked to supporters and colleagues after her second state of the city speech Wednesday.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley’s second state of the city address this Wednesday morning focused on the improving economy, and the mayor’s agenda for education and city services. Whaley touted the boom in downtown housing, a drop in crime rates, and shouted out businesses and microbreweries that have opened up.

Cleveland Police Chief Calvin Williams, Mayor Frank Jackson, Attorney General Eric Holder, Civil Rights Division head Vanita Gupta and U.S. Attorney for Northern Ohio Steven Dettelbach were all present at a press conference Thursday announcing the DOJ's f
M.L. Schultze / WKSU

CLEVELAND (AP) — Cleveland police say they will soon be issuing body cameras to police officers in the hope of reducing confrontations between officers and citizens, use of force and citizen complaints.

The city has ordered 1,500 cameras that will be distributed over several months to its five police districts. Officers are being ordered to use the cameras whenever they stop a pedestrian or motorist, are involved in a chase or are at crime and accident scenes.

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