WYSO

City of Dayton

Educators FASTER training target practice ideastream guns teachers schools conceal carry concealed NRA firearms ALICE (Alert, Lockdown, Inform, Counter, Evacuate
ctive shooter simulation training [Annie Wu / ideastream]

Ohio state law prohibits firearms inside school buildings, but school boards have the right to give individuals permission to conceal carry.

At the Faculty/Administrator Safety Training and Emergency Response or FASTER training, educators prepare in case of an active shooter. On the third and last day, participants go through an active shooter simulation.

At Wadsworth High School, a role-playing scenario unfolds with one person pretending to be an active shooter.

Entrepreneurs looking to start food-based businesses in the Miami Valley will soon have the opportunity to create and test their recipes in Fairborn. City officials Wednesday announced a new initiative to support small business entrepreneurs with a shared kitchen and office space incubator. 

The new incubator, which could open as early as January, 2018, will take over the longtime home of Roush's Restaurant on Main Street. The Fairborn Development Corp. purchased the vacant property with more than $200,000 after the 54-year-old institution closed its doors in 2015. 

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

Officials in Dayton plan to resume using cameras to catch drivers who run red lights, two years after dropping that practice to comply with Ohio restrictions and a legal battle.

The Dayton City Commission approved the program's restart in a 5-0 vote Wednesday.

City officials say speed detectors and red-light cameras will make the city safer. Police officials have said traffic crashes increased, and the number of traffic deaths doubled after the original red light cameras were removed.

Jerry Kenney

Mayor Nan Whaley delivered the annual State of the City address to a full house at City Hall on Wednesday morning. In the 15 minute speech, Whaley touched on multiple issues, including the local and regional economy, downtown revitalization efforts, infrastructure, and education - a focal point of her administration since she took office three years ago.

The mayor noted that Dayton had seen some "dark days" with business closures, unemployment, home foreclosures and vacant and abandoned buildings, yet, proclaimed in her speech, "Dayton is roaring back!"

A trolley bus parked at RTA headquarters in Dayton.
Pat O'Malley, RTA

Dayton is one of only five US cities that still have electric trolley buses. Listener Aaron Hill had several questions about the trolleys: he wondered about their history, their cost compared to diesel buses, and the future of the trolley system.

Dayton voters said yes to Issue 9 and voted to increase taxes on city residents to 2.5 percent.  The levy will raise funds to cover a $5 million budget shortfall and provide funding for universal pre-K education and street maintenance.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley was pleased with the voters' decision and told WYSO News that the new funds were the focus of this morning’s city budget meeting.

At Wednesday’s Dayton City Commission meeting, local residents expressed their growing frustration surrounding Garden Station. The downtown Dayton community garden was once a high-crime area that volunteers spent eight years renovating.

 

The city-owned land between 3rd and 4th streets along Wayne Avenue is now part of a development deal with Kentucky-based Weyland Ventures, formerly City Properties Group.

 

Aesopposea

The owners of the Dayton Hara Arena have announced they will close their doors for good after an Aug. 27th event.

For more than 60 years, Hara has hosted music, sports and special interest shows.

Owners say a 20-year court battle has drained them financially and kept them from making needed renovations to the facility. The inter-family legal battle was the result of the unresolved estate of Hara founder Harold Wampler who died in 1996.

The Dayton School Board has shelved plans to put a new levy on the fall ballot.

The 5-mill levy was supposed to pay for afterschool programs and preschool for all 4 year olds in Dayton.  Plans changed after the City of Dayton decided to put its own levy on the ballot - one that would also cover universal preschool, among other things.

The city of Dayton is moving forward with plans to put a tax hike on the November ballot.

City commissioners voted yesterday to place a new 8 year levy on the ballot that would raise city income taxes by .25 percent.  That would bring Dayton’s tax rate up to 2.5 percent, making it one of the highest rates in the Miami Valley.

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