WYSO

Cincinnati

Flickr Creative Commons User Reneek_

The Cincinnati City Council has approved funding in the city's 2018 budget for a needle exchange program aimed at stopping the spread of HIV and hepatitis C by intravenous drug users. 

  The council voted last week to provide $150,000 to the program based at the University of Cincinnati. City money will pay for at least four mobile sites served by a van.

The program had been funded by a 20-county nonprofit health agency called Interact for Health. A Cincinnati councilman began pushing for city funding of the needle exchange program after grant money dried up.

Donald Trump
Michael Vadon / Flickr/Creative Commons

President Donald Trump will discuss his plans for a $1 trillion overhaul of the nation's crumbling roads, bridges and waterways during a speech in Ohio Wednesday.

 The president will deliver remarks at the Rivertowne Marina in Cincinnati. He's expected to press efforts to repair the nation's aging levees, dams, locks and ports, as well as his larger infrastructure aims.

The speech comes as the White House tries to push past a series of distractions and focus on Trump's legislative agenda.

View of Cincinnati from the mouth of the Licking River. Economist Richard Stock says more and more people are taking the trip down I-75 for work.
Robert S. Donovan / Flickr/Creative Commons

The city council has declared Cincinnati as a "sanctuary city," a label that isn't legally defined but typically indicates reduced cooperation with federal immigration authorities on some matters involving people who are in the U.S. illegally.

It's mostly symbolic. Mayor John Cranley has said Cincinnati has long welcomed immigrants and will continue to support them, but won't break federal law.

Supporters and opponents of the move packed the council meeting.

Tom Kavana/Flickr Creative Commons

The head of a Cincinnati-area drug task force is calling on the state to declare a public health emergency to free up more resources for fighting heroin.

After a recent spike of overdoses, Newtown Police Chief Tom Synan, who heads the task force, is calling the situation a public health crisis. 

Ken "kcdsTM" / Flickr

A newspaper is reporting that shootings in Cincinnati increased nearly 28 percent in 2015 compared with the previous year, and the city's mayor says reducing gun violence is the top priority in the new year.
 
The Cincinnati Enquirer reports the number of shooting victims last year was 479, the highest since the 510 reported in 2006. The newspaper also reports homicides increased to 71 in 2015, up nearly 13 percent over 2014.
 
Political and law enforcement officials say they are working to find answers to the violence outbreak.

CINCINNATI (AP) — A 26-year Cincinnati police veteran is set to be sworn in as the department's new chief after filling the role on an interim basis.

Eliot Isaac was named acting chief after Jeffrey Blackwell's ouster in September. A public swearing-in ceremony for the 49-year-old Cincinnati native was scheduled Monday afternoon.

The city had conducted a survey that found that residents who responded wanted the new police chief to emphasize department morale and community policing. They also preferred a chief from within Cincinnati's department, unlike the last two chiefs.

Why Do Cincinnatians And Clevelanders Dislike Each Other?

Dec 4, 2015
Jim Nolan / WVXU

Other than the Steelers, there's one team every Bengals fan loves to hate. Cincinnati squares off against the Cleveland Browns this weekend in a rivalry that's only grown over the years... especially when former coach Sam Wyche famously chastised a Cincinnati crowd saying, "You don't live in Cleveland, you live in Cincinnati!" Earlier this year WVXU's Tana Weingartner teamed up with Kabir Bhatia at WKSU in Kent to figure out the source of all this intrastate animosity.

Whitaker’s photograph for “After the Moment” that he describes in the story:  “Playing with the Edge, page 70  Elliot&Dominick, 1979”
courtesy of Joel Whitaker

In the late 1980’s, photographer Robert Mapplethorpe’s exhibition “The Perfect Moment” fueled the fire of the so-called “Culture Wars” that pitted politicians like Senator Jesse Helms and the religious right against artists and museums in a battle over federal arts funding and first amendment rights.  When Mapplethorpe’s exhibit opened at the Contemporary Arts Center in Cincinnati, the museum and its director were brought up on obscenity charges. Twenty-five years later, the museum, through a major exhibit and symposium, is considering the impact of those events on the arts in America.

Ohio Dem Leader: Cincinnati Council Should Focus On Crime

Jul 17, 2015
Keith Lanser

The chairman of Ohio's Democratic Party is calling on current Cincinnati council members to focus on a solution for the city's recent crime spike.

Chairman and former city councilman David Pepper tells The Cincinnati Enquirer the increase in crime is a crisis. He says Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld, who's running for U.S. Senate, should put in the time to make a difference in the community.

A Cincinnati police officer and a suspect were taken to University Medical Center after an exchange of gunfire in Madisonville Friday morning.

During a briefing, Chief Jeffery Blackwell said officers and probation officers were responding to a report of a person with a gun acting erratically around 9 p.m. near Whetsel and Roe. Blackwell said when officers arrived there was an exchange of gunfire. One officer and the suspect were both wounded.

As of Friday morning, a city hall official said the officer has died from his injuries.

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