Dottie Stover / University of Cincinnati

A University of Cincinnati researcher, studying the safety of hookah steam stones, has found residues of toxic metals in simulated smoking scenarios.


Hookah steam stones are billed by the companies who make them as "hookah without the tobacco risk," and commonly considered a safer alternative to cigarette smoking.


But Amberlie Clutterbuck, a UC doctoral student, found residues of toxic metals that included chromium, arsenic and cadmium.


Ohio Earns Low Scores on Cancer Prevention Policies

Aug 22, 2014

Ohio is falling behind on strong cancer-prevention policies, according to a new report from a leading cancer-fighting organization. The study especially notes shortfalls in tobacco-related issues.

A cigarette tax increase, a tobacco prevention funding hike and more restrictions on tobacco-use… the American Cancer Society says Ohio could do better with all these. While Gov. John Kasich did call for a 60-cent increase in the cigarette tax earlier this year, that proposal has stalled.

This episode features Dr. Robert Arceci, the current director of Pediatric Oncology at Johns Hopkins University, editor-in-chief of Pediatric Blood and Cancer magazine, and the creator of A Lion in the House, an Emmy-Award winning documentary released in 2006 that provides the unique perspectives of pediatric patients with cancer who come from starkly varying socioeconomic backgrounds.

Over the years, certain vitamins and minerals have been touted as useful in warding off cancer, dementia and other diseases. That’s often followed by studies that disprove the claim or raise serious doubts. The cycle continues this week with news from the Cleveland Clinic about megadoses of vitamin E. Anne Glausser from member station WCPN has the details.