Books

Sue Grafton continues to work her way through the alphabet in her long-running detective series that features her beloved character Kinsey Millhone. "W is for Wasted" is the 23rd book in the series. In this interview Sue Grafton talks about the challenges she faces in trying not to repeat herself and what we might expect from the last three books and the letters of the alphabet that she will be covering as this series draws to a close in coming years.

Michael Ruhlman is a food guy. He loves to talk about food, write about it, cook it and eat it! Over the past 20 years Ruhlman has established his reputation as one of the most knowledgeable and discerning foodies in America.

In this interview we talked about schmaltz, the forgotten fat, and charcuterie, the art of salting, smoking and curing meats. As you listen to our conversation I dare you to stay out of the kitchen. I dare you. Bon appetit!

Hurricane Katrina brought many horrors to the New Orleans area. One of the worst things that happened eight years ago when Katrina made landfall occurred at the St. Rita's Nursing Home as a massive wall of water washed over the facility. 34 residents lost their lives.

This particular sad event stood out among the many horrors that took place. There was a media feeding frenzy. People wanted to know why these unfortunate souls had not been evacuated before the storm hit?

Ricky Skaggs has enjoyed a long career as one of the best mandolin players on the planet. He has been playing since he was a small boy. At an early age he met many of his musical idols; Bill Monroe, Lester Flatt, Ralph Stanley. He decided that it was finally time to tell his story. And what a story he has to tell in this memoir "Kentucky Traveler - My Life in Music."

Vicki Carr has been investigating suspicious fires in the Dayton area for many years. Her thorough understanding of arson informs her debut novel "Flashover."

As the story begins a building is burning and this blaze has many telltale indications that it was intentionally set. Fire investigator Carly Crinshaw is on the case and we quickly find ourselves engulfed in her investigation.

Wayne Koestenbaum writes widely and he thinks deeply. This latest collection of essays takes readers to some unexpected places. A random sampling of some of his essay titles from this collection might give you a sense of some of the areas that he explores here: "Heidegger's Mistress," "Susan Sontag, Cosmophage," "Privacy in the Films of Lana Turner," "Cary Grant Nude," and "Debbie Harry at the Supermarket."

Koestenbaum's insights can range from scintillating to provocative. Fortunately he's also quite entertaining. Please listen to this interview and see you if you don't agree.

Jeff Epton recently released "Wild Once and Captured," a collection of his poetry. Epton's poems radiate a golden glow. Each one is like a highly polished bit of amber. These poems capture and preserve his musings on beauty, determination, and struggle.

Author, essayist and poet Wendell Berry has been named winner of the Dayton Literary Peace Prize's lifetime achievement award. The award recognizes his steadfast promotion of the need for people to live in harmony with their environment.

The 79-year-old Kentucky-based writer of works highlighting the benefits of a simpler life backs up his words with his actions. He speaks out against strip-mining and other development he says damages the land. Meanwhile, he keeps a garden, raises sheep and lives largely technology-free on a hilly farm.

Almost twenty years ago I had a life changing experience. An author walked in to the studio for an interview. I had loved his book and was looking forward to meeting him. When he passed through the airlock the first thing I noticed about him was a twinkle in his eye.

Nearly a century ago, during The Great Depression, there was rash of rare book thefts from libraries in New England and across the Midwest. Book thieves were stealing obscure treasures and then selling them to unscrupulous book dealers. The book sellers would try to conceal the provenance of these rarities by removing identifying markings so that they could then resell them to collectors. Some of these merchants operated in Manhattan in an area where there was a heavy concentration of rare book dealers. This area was known as Book Row.

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