WYSO

Books - Fiction

Lara Elena Donnelly has just published "Amberlough." It is her debut novel. It was published by Tor Books, a major New York publisher. Lara grew up in Yellow Springs and had always wanted to be a writer. She has pursued her dreams with passion and now her determination and diligence is really paying off.

Listen to this interview to find out what her story is about and to learn about the journey that has brought her to this happy place in her life.

I read a lot of crime novels and some of them are very good. Occasionally I'll read one that completely dazzles me. "The Butcher's Hook" by Janet Ellis is one of those books that made me perspire with shock and astonishment. And this is her literary debut! Amazing.

Lee Child is one of the most generous writers around. He is an advocate for other writers. He provides enthusiastic blurbs for books he has enjoyed reading. A blurb from Lee Child can really give an unknown author a boost. I have Lee Child to thank for turning me on to a writer named Nicholas Petrie. Lee returned to the program recently and I quizzed him about books that he has really liked. He responded with a hearty endorsement of the work of Nick Petrie.
 

Over the years I have had the opportunity to interview authors at various stages in their careers. Some of the writers that I have interviewed have gone on to become spectacularly successful. Nicholas Sparks comes to mind. When I interviewed him for "The Notebook," his first book, he seemed slightly dazed by the positive early reviews and he was reluctant to believe that fame was in his future. Well, he has sold a gazillion books since our first interview and he quit his day job as a pharmaceutical salesman many years ago.

Angie Grigaliunas has created a stunning imaginary world in her dystopian fantasy novel "Sowing." This is the first book in her "Purification Era" series. She is still planning the series and during this interview she stated that it will probably take at least eight books to complete it.
 

Lisa Lutz gave us one of the standout novels of 2016. "The Passenger" was so clever, so enthralling, so devilishly twisted, that I had Lisa on the program for the hardcover release early in the year, then after I had spoken to her that first time I was so enchanted by her wit (and her novel) that I invited her back to the program for another visit when the book was issued in paperback later in the year.

James Church is a man of mysteries. The man known as James Church (it is a pseudonym) is the author of a series of mystery novels that feature the North Korean security officer Inspector O. The author of these books is clearly familiar with North Korea, spycraft, and the perils of espionage. The actual identity of the man who writes under the pen name of James Church remains clouded in a fog that is as thick as the one which obscures the workings of the regime that runs North Korea. Fortunately we have this series of books available to us.

On occasion I like to ask authors for tips on books that they have enjoyed recently. The other day I asked Lee Child for some reading suggestions. He said he always can count on John Sandford and Michael Connelly to provide him with entertaining reads. Then he suggested that I should read "The Drifter," a debut novel by Nicholas Petrie. I just finished reading it and I enjoyed it. Petrie's protagonist is a bit like Lee Child's Jack Reacher.
 

"Night School" is the latest Jack Reacher novel by Lee Child. Child is one of the hottest authors on the planet. This book went straight to #1 in the United Kingdom and the USA. Child's many fans know what they will be getting in every book; non-stop, seat of our pants, relentless thrills and entertainment.

Tiffany McDaniel has spent years honing her writing craft. She has had to focus with steely determination upon that most difficult of objectives; to see her work being published. Her novel "The Summer That Melted Everything" was recently issued by Saint Martin's Press.

This is a work of literary fiction. That is a term that is frequently abused but not in this case. What makes McDaniel's novel so striking is her originality-the language she employs is so vivid that it tumbles and spins across the pages. Here is a sample paragraph:
 

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