Aviation

The Dayton Walk of Fame is located in the Wright-Dunbar Business District
courtesy of the Wright-Dunbar Business District

Since Dayton’s bicentennial celebration in 1996, 156 individuals have been inducted into the city’s Walk of Fame. They have been recognized for their personal and professional contributions to science, technology, the arts, education, medicine and many other fields. Five of those individuals were just inducted in September. At a ceremony at Sinclair Community College, WYSO had the chance to talk to some of the inductees and their family members.

Caro Bosca: Flying And Flourishing Above The Clouds

Oct 9, 2015
Caro Bosca in 2001
Dan Patterson

Seventy years ago, Americans were celebrating the end of the Second World War and beginning the much-anticipated return to normal life, but "normal" had changed. Men who had gone to war expected to return to jobs and families, but while they were away, the homefront, as it was known, had changed. Aviation commentator Dan Patterson has a local story for us today:

 

Construction started last week on PSA Airline's expansion.
Ariel Van Cleave / WYSO

Construction is underway on a $14 million expansion for PSA Airlines at the Dayton International Airport.

 

The new, 69,000 square-foot hangar will house aircraft and act as an engine-parts storage facility for the airline. This project follows completion of another operations control center earlier this year.

 

PSA Airlines President Dion Flannery says the company is building the facility with an eye toward future growth.

 

Ohio Weather Forces Innovation In Early Flight

Jul 6, 2015
Dan Patterson Archival Collection

The rainy weather had our aviation commentator Dan Patterson a little frustrated. And he has some thoughts about Dayton weather and the early days of flying.

The great writer, poet and pilot, St. Exuperey wrote in 1939, "A pilot's business is with the wind, and with the stars, with night, with sand, with the sea.  He strives to outwit the forces of nature."

For flyers, the weather is the constant variable.  It determines where you're going to fly, if at all, and this weather lately...makes flying a challenge.

The Wright-B Flyer
Jerry Kenney/Wright State University

Pulitzer Prize winning author, David McCullough, has written a new book about the Wright Brothers – it’s a window into the world of the two young men who gave mankind one of it’s greatest achievements – flight.

Dan Patterson

Last week WYSO's aviation commentators, Paul Glenshaw and Dan Patterson, teamed up to cover the World War II Flyover in Washington DC. A parade of privately owned vintage warbirds celebrated the 70th of VE Day – the victory in Europe. Paul recorded voices and Dan took photographs to bring us this impression of the event.

9th Air Force P-47 Thunderbolts
Dan Patterson

Friday, May 8th is recognized as VE Day, which stands for Victory in Europe. 70 years ago, in the spring of 1945, American armies were streaming across Europe – the war was nearly over.  Part of the Americans' success came because they had learned how to support the troops and tanks on the ground with support with from the air.

Military flying began in 1914, in the early days of WWI as a way to see over the horizon and figure out what the enemy was up to.  Soon military flying became a sophisticated tactical and strategic weapon in itself.

Following Aviation History Along The Potomac River

Mar 26, 2015
Paul Glenshaw

If you’ve ever flown into Reagan National Airport in Washington DC, your plane followed the course of the Potomac River and past two places with special significance to aviation history in the nation’s capital. Aviation commentator Paul Glenshaw takes us there.

wright-brothers.org

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A descendant of the Wright brothers is headed to the Ohio Statehouse to defend the Ohio aviators' place in history as the first to make a successful airplane flight.

Amanda Wright Lane is great-grandniece of Wilbur and Orville Wright. She is scheduled to testify Tuesday in favor of a resolution that challenges Connecticut's insistence that one of its aviators beat the Wright brothers to the skies by two years.

Photo of NAHA display

The factory where the Wright Brothers built their original plane will produce another airplane soon - a new replica of the Wright-B Flyer is scheduled to take flight in 2016.

The announcement came from Jay Jabour—president of Wright “B” Flyer, Inc. standing just outside the Wright Company factory in Dayton.

Jabour told the attending press, “The opportunity to build a look-a-like of the 1911 airplane in the original 1911 factory is really exciting.”

Pages