Authors

Peter James has created a crafty series of crime novels set in the English city of Brighton. Detective Roy Grace is his protagonist in what I like to call his "Dead  Series" because every book has the word "dead" in the title. Grace is a determined sleuth. These books are carefully plotted. James spends a lot of time consulting with advisors, veteran police officers, to make sure that he has gotten all his details right. 

Chris West began collecting stamps when he was a boy in England. A couple of years ago West published a collection of essays inspired by various British stamps. Each essay was a reflection upon the British history evoked by a particular stamp. West knows his British stamps and his British history.

Do you feed your dog canned dog food? Do you ever think that perhaps your dog deserves better fare than that? I have just the book for you. Judith Jones has known and loved many dogs over the course of her long life. Her current dog, Mabon, gets the same food for his dinner that Jones has prepared for herself. In her book "Love Me, Feed Me - Sharing With Your Dog the Everyday Good Food You Cook and Enjoy" the author explains how she came to the point of deciding that Mabon deserved better dinners than canned dog food.

2014 was another great year for biographies. One of my favorites was a biography of Nelson Rockefeller. Here's my review which ran in the Cox Ohio newspapers:

Nelson Rockefeller pursued a dream over the course of his lifetime; he wanted to become the president of the United States. It was not meant to be, but he gave it his best shot.

In his latest book, the historian Richard Norton Smith notes that for this grandson of one the richest men in America, John D. Rockefeller: “the presidency is one of the few things beyond Rockefeller’s purchasing power.”

During the mid 1970's things were really heating up on the island of Jamaica. It had become chaotic. Violence was breaking out. Two political parties were wrestling for control of the government in a hotly contested election. The reggae star Bob Marley wanted to try to calm things down. He decided to do a concert in the hope of easing some of the tension.

Thomas Johnson has come to a crossroads in his career as a minister. The congregation at his church in a small Ohio town is in a bit of an uproar over Reverend Johnson's rumored relationship with a female member of his flock. He doesn't believe that he has done anything wrong but when he receives a phone call that provides him with a pretext to get out of town for a while he takes advantage of that opportunity to get away from it all.

The Dayton Peace Accords ended the war in Bosnia War in 1995 and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize was created as a response 11 years later. In this hour-long special, you'll hear speeches from authors who were honored for advancing peace through literature: Karima Bennoune, nonfiction winner for Your Fatwa Does Not Apply Here, Bob Shacochis, fiction winner for The Woman Who Lost Her Soul, and Louise Erdrich, winner of the Richard C. Holbroke Distinguished Achievement Award.

One hundred years ago President Woodrow Wilson was doing everything in his power to keep the United States out of the First World War. Wilson had experienced a miraculous ascent from virtual obscurity to claim the highest office in the land. His remarkable story has been meticulously researched and described by A. Scott Berg in his masterful biography "Wilson."

Roderick Kiracofe fell in love with quilts forty years ago. At the time he was living in SW Ohio. In his new book "Unconventional & Unexpected : American Quilts Below the Radar-1950-2000" he describes how he first became aware of quilts and how he then developed a passion for this under appreciated art form. Today he is one of our leading authorities on quilts.

Ann Hagedorn is a meticulous researcher. In her previous books she has tackled historical subjects which are now receding into history. Her latest book examines a topic that is so current that the story lines are shifting every day. In this interview you'll find out how hard it became to actually complete a book about issues that are constantly churning in a fluid fashion that is seemingly being updated and revised by the moment. Hagedorn immerses herself in her work. We were fortunate to have her come out to Yellow Springs to record this interview.

Pages