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Attorney General Mike DeWine

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The police on front lines of the nation's battle against deadly heroin are changing tactics and even redefining their roles in some communities.

In a suburban Cincinnati township and a northwest Ohio county, police in special teams try to intervene with users soon after overdose recovery. They want to steer them into treatment while near-death experiences are fresh, before they relapse.

A program that offers treatment-seeking addicts an amnesty is spreading to other states from a northern Massachusetts community's police department.

The state's forensic scientists have tested more than 9,800 rape kits submitted by law enforcement agencies around Ohio to check for possible DNA matches.

Nearly 12,000 kits had been submitted for testing as of Feb. 1 in an effort that began in 2011 to check previously untested kits for evidence. About 2,600 of those kits were submitted after a new law went into effect last March.

That law requires law enforcement agencies to submit any previously untested sexual assault kits associated with a past crime to a crime lab within a year.

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine presenting proposed training standards for police officers.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio’s Attorney General is calling for new pre-certification standards for peace officer applicants as well as more training for existing police officers. Mike DeWine wants the Ohio Peace Officer Training Commission to make sure all incoming academy candidates have a high school diploma or GED; pass a drug screening, a psychological exam, and a polygraph test; are physically fit and have not been convicted of sex offenses. He says these are things that are not uniformly done now.

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine
Statehouse News Bureau

The state’s top law enforcement official is warning that Ohio shoppers could find themselves duped out of lots of money this year if they’re not careful. Attorney General Mike DeWine says shoppers need to ask questions and document purchases carefully this holiday season.

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A ballot effort to boost Ohio's minimum wage has cleared an initial hurdle.

 

Attorney General Mike DeWine certified a petition for the proposed constitutional amendment Friday, saying it had the necessary signatures and a "fair and truthful" summary.

 

The proposal seeks to increase the minimum wage for non-tipped workers to $10 an hour on Jan. 1, 2017. That amount would then increase in 50-cent increments each year until it reaches $12 an hour in 2021.

 

Clark County law enforcement and health officials are ramping up their efforts to battle the recent increase in heroin related deaths and drug-related overdoses.

According to Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine's office, nearly 2,000 Ohioans have died from heroin related overdoses in the past year. Springfield Regional Medical Center has treated more than 100 patients for drug overdoses since January.

warrantedarrest / Flick Creative Commons

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The group working to get a marijuana legalization issue on Ohio's fall ballot has passed the next step in a separate effort to have some related crimes expunged.

ResponsibleOhio says its "Fresh Start Act" calls for reviewing and expunging criminal records for people with previous marijuana convictions if their actions would no longer be considered illegal under the legalization amendment.

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine cleared the petition language Monday, a move that sends the effort to the state Ballot Board for further review.

Attorney General Mike DeWine made the settlement announcement during a news conference Wednesday. Ohio Dept. of Transportation Director Jerry Wray was at his side.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Many of Ohio’s cities and townships will soon be getting a check from a court settlement with companies that provide road salt.

Under the agreement, the Morton and Cargill companies will pay a combined $11.5 million. Most of the money will be distributed to local governments that Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine says spent too much on road salt for about a decade.

Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine’s Advisory Group on Law Enforcement Training is recommending some changes it says will improve policing statewide. This group wants some standards to determine who should get into training classes and increases training for officers statewide.

DeWine says there are few requirements for people who want to enroll in police officer training academics throughout the state.

The law enforcement training panel created by Attorney General Mike DeWine met for a final time Monday before it will issue a report later this month. 

The advisory group is expected to make recommendations on training standards for law enforcement, especially in community relations and in situations involving the use of force. Chair Reggie Wilkinson, who once headed the state’s prison system, says to make sure its report doesn’t just sit around – as task force reports often do – the group wants to consider recommendations that can be implemented without lawmaker approval.

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