Arts & Culture

Duke Ellington and band members playing baseball in front of their segregated motel ("Astor Motel") while touring in Florida.
Charlotte Brooks, photographer, LOOK Magazine Photograph Collection, Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division

When you hear the word swing, do you think of baseball or jazz?  This week Wright State University will host the first national conference to explore the connections:  “The Sultans of Swing: 100 Years of Baseball, Jazz, and Short Fiction”.  In the early 20th century, African Americans took great pride in baseball’s Negro Leagues and famous jazz musicians, but they still lived with segregation.  David Seitz traces this history in our latest Culture Couch story.   

Janeal Ravndal reads her sonnet "In Response to Terrorism."

Janeal Ravndal reads Maureen Fry's poem, "Dusk."

courtesy of Dayton Performing Arts Alliance

This weekend, Kenny G, the best selling instrumental artist in history, will share the stage with the Dayton Philharmonic.  WYSO Music Director Niki Dakota spoke with the legendary saxophone player by phone ahead of his visit to the Miami Valley.

The Dayton Philharmonic presents an evening with Kenny G Friday, April 8th and Saturday, April 9th at the Schuster Center.  More details at: http://daytonperformingarts.org/

Meg Renee returned to the WYSO studios for to share new live and recorded material on Kaleidoscope.  She spoke with host Juliet Fromholt about developing and recording her latest songs, upcoming live gigs and her upcoming college plans.

Meg Renee will perform at Father John's Brewery in Bryan on April 21st, at Cafe Paradiso in Urbana on April 23rd and at Meier's Wine Cellar in Cincinnati on May 7th.  More live dates at: http://www.megrenee.com/shows

Sharon Elaine Photography

Since their last visit to the WYSO studios, Jamie Suttle and her band have been keeping busy with live gigs and writing new material for an upcoming album.  The band returned to WYSO for a live acoustic set on Kaleidoscope and spoke with host Juliet Fromholt about their plans for the upcoming spring and summer.

Jamie Suttle will perform on April 15th at W.O. Wrights and April 22nd at Oddbody's.

Students perform at the 2014 Wright State University ArtsGala
courtesy of Wright State University

After last year's record-setting event, Wright State University's College of Liberal Arts is preparing for the 17th  annual ArtsGala.  Assistant Dean of the College of Liberal Arts Jennie Buckwalter and several Wright State arts students joined WYSO's Niki Dakota in the studio for a preview of the event that benefits students.

Wright State University's ArtsGala is Saturday, April 9th 6:30pm - midnight.  More information is at: wright/edu/artsgala

Decorate Your Walls With A Trip To The Library

Apr 4, 2016
Taylor Kordic, a student at Cedarville University, is a big fan of the art at the library—and, the bags that come with that art.
Steve McQueen / WYSO

Libraries have always had books, but these days, they provide more services than just literature, including art rental. Culture Couch got interested in who actually uses the art rental services—and I met one young library enthusiast showed me an amazing art gallery he created in his apartment, all on loan from the library.

Adrian McKinty is my favorite Irish crime writer. I have wanted to interview him for years. This interview took a long time to happen. Years, actually. McKinty is the author of a series that is set in Northern Ireland during the period known as The Troubles.

During this interview the author explains how difficult it was to write these books. He had been discouraged in doing so because people kept telling him that nobody wanted to read about that dark period or remember it. But McKinty persevered. I'm so glad that he did.

By the 1830's the state of Ohio had been completely settled except for one very inhospitable area in northwest Ohio known as the Great Black Swamp. In Tracy's Chevalier's latest historical novel "At the Edge of the Orchard" we encounter the Goodenough family. They have moved to Ohio from Connecticut and settled in the only place available to them, the mosquito infested muck of those swamps.

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