Arts & Culture

Juliet Fromholt

Dave Doughman and Don Thrasher of Swearing at Motorists have a long history with WYSO.  For their first visit to Kaleidoscope, Doughman performs acoustic renditions of their songs and the duo discuss their upcoming show at Canal Street Tavern. 

Library of Congress

One quiet autumn morning the United States was suddenly attacked by a small band of determined men inspired by a charismatic religious fanatic. The emotional response by the entire country to an unprovoked raid, which caused the deaths of innocent civilians, lead the United States to war. The year was 1859, the place was Harpers Ferry, Virginia, and the leader was John Brown.

David Lee Garrison joins Conrad Balliet in the WYSO studios to talk about their common background in traditional verse.  They talk about different styles of poetry and how writing in rhyme can be liberating.  Garrison shares examples of several types of poems and talks about what inspired each.

www.ganeshphotography.com/

Trevor Hall's self-titled album is his first release on Vanguard Records.  Hall and his band visited the WYSO studios on the road from Iowa to Columbus and performed several live songs.  Hall chats with Niki Dakota about community in songwriting and getting to meet and tour with Matisyahu.  Trevor Hall be opening for Michael Franti and Spearhead at the Newport Music Hall in Columbus tonight. 

There are 27 players on Flotation Walls' new album, Nature, but for touring and live performances, the band is made up of four people - all of whom wear distinct yellow costumes.  The visited the WYSO studios ahead of their performance at the Dayton Dirt Collective for a live set and to talk about recording Nature, translating their recordings to a live show and their decision to begin touring full time.

Flotation Walls is playing at the Dayton Dirt Collective on Thursday, September 24, 2009 with Finding Fiction and The Space Race.

2007 Fabrizio Ferri

Some might say trumpeter Chris Botti has a natural talent for performing and composing contemporary jazz music. According to Botti, however, he wasn’t born with it.

“Talent is really 99% drive and focus, and 1% luck,” said Botti in this Excursions interview.

Susan Frikken

 

Who makes a perfect “road trip record?” According to Niki Dakota, it’s Peter Mulvey.

Singer-songwriter Peter Mulvey has been recording and touring as a solo artist since the early 1990’s. Originally from Wisconsin, Mulvey’s music has taken him everywhere from Dublin, Ireland to the streets of Boston, where he performed early on in his career. Over the last 15 years, he has steadily developed a following through critically acclaimed folk records like 2006’s “The Knuckleball Suite.”

 

Jokes abound in this laughter-filled 2009 Excursions interview with multi-talented country and jazz musician Dan Hicks.

Hicks has been playing music for over 50 years. Beginning as a drummer as a young child, Hicks joined folk-rock group the Charlatans in 1965. Hicks struck out on his own in the late ‘60s, putting together backing band the Hot Licks for a string of records, including 1973’s classic “Last Train to Hicksville.” The band broke up in the mid-70’s, but has since reformed, releasing several records and touring internationally for the last decade.

Tomorrow night Cityfolk's celebration of Dayton born pianist/composer Billy Strayhorn comes to an end. Rounding out the week long tribute will be a performance from the Stivers School for the Arts Jazz Orchestra. Jerry Kenney reports on the student's at Stivers and how they're learning a legacy.

Library of Congress

One hundred years ago this week, the citizens of Dayton, Ohio and surrounding communities watched in disbelief as collapsing levees allowed flood waters to overtake the city in a matter of moments.    

WYSO and the Living History Theatre present an original radio drama, "The End of Emerald Street."  Set during the Great Dayton Flood, the story combines fictional characters with historical figures like John H. Patterson, Arthur Morgan, and John Barringer.

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