Arts & Culture

Conrad Balliet reads Terry Hermsen's poem, "Driving Northeast."

Conrad Balliet reads Marian Schwilke-Thomas' poem, "April Fools Day."

Conrad Balliet reads Maureen Fry's poem, "Sorting Out - For a Friend Moving Away."

Cincinnati band the Lions Rampant are hot off the release of their new album, It's Fun to Do Bad Things.  The band already celebrated the album's release in their hometown and will also do shows in Dayton, Columbus and Chicago in support of the record.  Nick and Nate from the Lions Rampant visited the WYSO studios to share some tracks from their new album and talk about the band's upcoming plans.

The Lions Rampant will celebrate the release of It's Fun to Do Bad Things in Dayton on Saturday, March 27th at South Park Tavern. 

Conrad Balliet reads John Booth's poem, "Mother Nature and the Invisible Man."

Conrad Balliet reads Lianne Spidel's poem, "What to Leave Anna."

Conrad Balliet reads Marian Schwilke-Thomas' poem, "The Boat of What I Know."

This Sunday marks the debut of the Yellow Springs Short Film Festival at the Little Art Theater.

 

"There's a range in films. There are 17 in total, and they're all from local or regional filmmakers. Mainly Greene county, Montgomery county and Clark at this point, but there's also one from Warren county. They range from 1 to 15 minutes, but most of them are between five and ten [minutes]. So 17 films, but it's not too long of a program," says Vanessa Query, an Antioch College grad and the guiding force behind the film festival.

 

 

Jay Ungar and Molly Mason stop by Excursions to chat with Niki Dakota and to demonstrate their wonderful brand of American Folk music.

Jay and Molly first met during the 1970s and were eventually wed in 1991 and have been playing together since. The duo (utilizing folk standard of fiddle, guitar and piano) play a wide variety of folk music ranging from Appalachian, Cajun, and Celtic. The duo even branches into golden age swing and country occasionally. The duo plays with an expertise and cohesiveness that is almost unparalleled in the folk music world.

Conrad Balliet reads Myrna Stone's poem, "Call Up the Dead and They Come to You."

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