WYSO

Arts & Culture

Some interviews  can make a powerful impression. One interview that has stood the test of time is the one that I had in 1998 with Dr. Leonard Shlain about his book "The Alphabet Versus the Goddess: The Conflict Between Word and Image." Nearly twenty years later listeners will still mention it.

Rita Coleman reads Joy Schwab's poem, "Water and Ice"

The Dayton Literary Peace Prize was founded in 2005 - ten years after the Dayton Peace Accords ended the war in Bosnia.  The prize honors authors from around the world for fiction, non-fiction and lifetime achievement. And it's the only international literary peace prize in the United States.

Herb Martin reads his poem, "This Body is Made of Camphor and Gopher Wood"

Hailing from Wilmington, Ohio, Seahorse Run visited the WYSO studios for a live set on Excursions.  They talked with Niki Dakota about writing and recording their new EP Seahorse Ran and more.

Seahorse Run's EP, Seahorse Ran, is available now at https://seahorserun.bandcamp.com/releases

After a busy 2017 that included the release of their new EP Thunder Taker returned to the WYSO studios for a live musical preview of the Dayton Underground Series' End of Year Bash.  The band talked about their new EP and their plans for 2018 with Kaleidoscope host Juliet Fromholt, and they were joined by Music Connection Dayton's Kimberly Weiss who talked about the upcoming show and local music awards.

The Dayton Underground Series' End of Year Bash is Thursday, December 28 at Oscar's in Vandalia. 

Julie Moore reads Maureen Fry's poem, "I Forget You"

Regular Excursions guest, Jeff Opt visited the WYSO studios to talk with Music Director Niki Dakota about upcoming events at the Yellow Cab this winter.  

The venue will host a a special Canal Street Stories event honoring Mick Montgomery's former music venue on January 6, a special New Year's Eve ball drop and more.  For a full schedule of events, visit: http://www.yellowcabtavern.com/

Conrad Balliet reads his poem, "The Night After Christmas."

Clifton Fadiman was one of my boyhood idols. I admired him-to my young mind he epitomized wisdom and savoir faire. He was quick and witty and so very erudite. I hadn't thought about him in years. Then last summer an advance copy of a memoir crossed my desk. It was a book by Anne Fadiman, Clifton's daughter, and the book is mostly about her relationship with him. I was intrigued and I immediately contacted her publicist to request an interview with the author upon the publication of her book.

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