Antioch College

Antioch College President Roosevelt and former Ohio Governor Bob Taft are both the great-grandsons of American Presidents. Roosevelt's great grandfather was Theodore Roosevelt, President from 1901 to 1909. He was succeeded by William Howard Taft of Cincinnati.

The relationship between the two men is chronicled in The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft and the Golden Age of Journalism, by Doris Kearns Goodwin, published in 2013. They two were allies; Taft served as Roosevelt’s Secretary of War, but later clashed and Roosevelt ran against Taft in 1912.

courtesy of Antioch College

On October 25, 2014, Nick Boutis, Executive Director of the Glen Helen Ecology Institute at Antioch College delivered the following keynote address the University of Dayton's Sustainability Summit.

The gist of what I’m going to tell you over the next few minutes is that, when life gives you lemons, make a lemon meringue pie. Lemonade is fine, and all, but sometimes new challenges call for new solutions.

In the fall of 2011, after a three-year closure that many assumed was permanent, Antioch College reopened its doors to students.

Why?

The Andrew Goodman Foundation

When James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner went to Mississippi in 1964 to register black voters, it’s likely they were unaware of the danger they faced.

Reflecting on the People's Climate March

Nov 1, 2014
Olivia Minella

On September 21, Antioch Students and Faculty as well as residents from Yellow Springs took a bus to New York City to attend the People’s Climate March and show their support for taking action against global climate issues. Wyatt Souers talked to Antioch College class of 2017 students Frank Fortino, Hannah Craig, Perin Ellsworth-Heller, Sean Allen, Ian Rosenthal, and Lauren Gjessing about why they were at the March.

Climate Marchers Return Inspired, New Protests Begin

Sep 23, 2014
Austin Rinebolt-Miller

A group of Antioch College students got back Monday morning from the People’s Climate March in New York City. The march was expected to be the largest and most diverse in history at over 100,000 people. Now organizers are pegging the count at at least 310,000.

Several dozen Antioch students and several hundred Ohioans had planned to attend the march on buses. Antioch students hoped to bring back new energy about fighting global climate change.

Ohioans Prepare For People's Climate March

Sep 19, 2014
Demonstrators at the 2010 Cancun Climate Summit.
Velcrow Ripper / Flickr/Creative Commons

Hundreds of Ohio residents, including a large group from Antioch College, will get on buses, trains and take carpools to New York City this weekend for the People’s Climate March on Sunday, September 21.

The People’s Climate March is being billed as the first of its kind and the largest climate march ever; it’s a protest against global climate change just as the United Nations convenes a climate summit.

Basma Alsharif

Basma Alsharif is a nomadic artist who incorporates field recordings from the Gaza Strip into her latest project, Disappearing Acts, which is on display at Antioch College's Herndon Gallery.  Alsharif's work spans different artistic mediums, and the local display will incorporate film, photography and sound and includes several juxtaposed pieces from Alsharif's body of work.  Alsharif and co-curator Charles Fairbanks visited the WYSO studios ahead of the opening reception and spoke with Excursions host Niki Dakota about Alsharif's work and some of the elements of the exhibit.

Over the break between the spring and summer quarters at Antioch seven students and three faculty and staff members traveled to the Freedom Summer 50 conference in Mississippi as part of a course called Community Engagement: Freedom Summer. In July the class held a panel to discuss their travels in the south with the community. Tune in to this edition of the word to hear excerpts from the panel and learn all about Antioch students’ experiences at the conference.

Dennie Eagleson

Gabrielle Civil, Associate Professor of Performance at Antioch College, came to WYSO today to talk about the second part of the Call and Response event, or dynamic of black women and performance. In July seven black women artists, each with a different relationship to the words black, women, and performance, came to Antioch to develop a call to the community; a prompt to make art in a different way. The call that they came up with is to conduct experiments in joy.

The Foundry Theater has been an important part of the Antioch and Yellow Springs since its inception in 1956. Unfortunately the theater was closed when Antioch reopened. However, after beginning construction in July of 2013 phase one of renovations have recently been completed, and the theater is now once again able to host public events. WYSO Miller Fellow Wyatt Souers talked with soon to be Associate Professor of Performance Louise Smith, class of 2017 Antioch student Hannah Craig, and Associate Professor of Performance Gabriele Civil about this exciting development.

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