Antioch College

An Antioch Record article about Florynce Kennedy's appearance at the College
courtesy of Antiochiana, Antioch College

Florynce Kennedy,  an outspoken attorney and activist who bridged the Women’s Liberation and Black Power Movements in the 1960s and 70s, said “A woman without a man is like a fish without a bicycle.” She was outrageous and defiant and with her middle finger in the air and a cowboy hat on her head, she came to Antioch in 1971 to talk about fighting oppression. WYSO was there.

Cecil Taylor
Charles Rotmil / via wikimedia commons

The American jazz pianist Cecil Taylor is a pioneer of what is called free jazz—music which often discards notated scores and breaks with meter and conventional harmonic progression. Now 87, his first recordings were released in the 1950s. In the late 1960s and early 70s Taylor taught at Antioch College and recordings from his years in Yellow Springs are found in the WYSO archives.

During Antioch College's alumni weekend in September, current students and past graduates participated in an open forum about their co-op experiences. In this forum, recorded by WYSO Miller Fellow Mari Smith, you'll hear perspectives from current students Lucas Bautista '18, Malka Berrow '18, and Catalina La Mers-Noble '18 and alumni Bruce Lebel '76, Karen W. Mulhauser '65 and Robert Goldsmith '76.

Last May at Antioch College, students of color filled the Coretta Scott King Center in secret to have a difficult discussion about race and culture. They called it a "day of disappearance". The idea was to show the college what a day without people of color, or POC would look like. Community voices producer and Miller Fellow Mari Smith     sat in on the day of disappearance and spoke with the participants to hear their experiences. 

Antioch College
Juliet Fromholt / WYSO

Antioch College is once again, a fully accredited educational institution. Today the Higher Learning Commission granted the status to the college, which has been working aggressively to regain accreditation since it re-opened in 2011. 

Provost and Vice-President of Academic Affairs, Lori Collins-Hall, says it was Antioch alumni who positioned the college for a comeback.

Ohayo Ohio is a 10-day Japanese symposium and cultural event taking place in Yellow Springs from April 30 through May 9. A variety of workshops, presentations and exhibits on traditional and contemporary Japanese art, culture and language will be offered. In this excerpt from WYSO Weekend, Jerry Kenney spoke with Instructor of Cooperative Education at Antioch College and symposium organizer Beth Bridgeman. You can check out the full schedule of events here.    

  WYSO is licensed to Antioch College.

Antioch College

The mass movement of people across national boundaries has become one of the defining characteristics of our era. In the Americas, Europe, the Middle East and North Africa, millions of people—welcomed and unwelcomed—are fleeing the effects of war, poverty, crime, intergroup conflict, and environmental change. At the same time, political discourse in the US has sunk to new depths with national political leaders calling for the construction of walls and moratoria on the acceptance of refugees.

Courtesy of Antioch College

A pivotal part of the Antioch experience is leaving the campus once a year to go on co-op somewhere around the world. Antioch College's second year students (the class of 2018) recently returned from co-op and shared their experiences during a special edition of Community Meeting called Co-op Swap. WYSO hosted the event with Juliet Fromholt moderating the discussion, and WYSO Miller Fellow Mari Smith recorded the students' responses.

On this day, Antioch's 'solar sheep' move in a line formation, chomping and chewing on tufts of tall grass around acres of solar array panels.
Jerry Kenney

At Antioch College, there are solar array fields with solar panels that soak up the sun and convert it to energy for the college to use. These have been around for a couple of years, and have worked extremely well for the college. For a few years on the Antioch College Farm, sheep have been raised for meat for consumption in the dining halls. This year, Antioch College implemented a new program where they combined these two things together, the solar array and the sheep, to make a pilot program to cut down on fossil fuel emissions.

Odette Chavez-Mayo

On September 28, the class of 2019 arrived on Antioch’s campus. This is the first class that didn’t receive a full Horace Mann Scholarship, but a half scholarship.  Yet due to an anonymous donation worth over $1 million, Antioch extended full tuition to a group of first-generation college students and environmental science majors. These environmental science majors are called LEAF (Leadership in the Environment at Antioch Fellowship) Scholars.  I had never heard of them until we had co-existed on Antioch’s campus together for several weeks so I decided to find out: Who are they?

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