Antioch College

Antioch College
Juliet Fromholt / WYSO

Antioch College is once again, a fully accredited educational institution. Today the Higher Learning Commission granted the status to the college, which has been working aggressively to regain accreditation since it re-opened in 2011. 

Provost and Vice-President of Academic Affairs, Lori Collins-Hall, says it was Antioch alumni who positioned the college for a comeback.

Ohayo Ohio is a 10-day Japanese symposium and cultural event taking place in Yellow Springs from April 30 through May 9. A variety of workshops, presentations and exhibits on traditional and contemporary Japanese art, culture and language will be offered. In this excerpt from WYSO Weekend, Jerry Kenney spoke with Instructor of Cooperative Education at Antioch College and symposium organizer Beth Bridgeman. You can check out the full schedule of events here.    

  WYSO is licensed to Antioch College.

Antioch College

The mass movement of people across national boundaries has become one of the defining characteristics of our era. In the Americas, Europe, the Middle East and North Africa, millions of people—welcomed and unwelcomed—are fleeing the effects of war, poverty, crime, intergroup conflict, and environmental change. At the same time, political discourse in the US has sunk to new depths with national political leaders calling for the construction of walls and moratoria on the acceptance of refugees.

Courtesy of Antioch College

A pivotal part of the Antioch experience is leaving the campus once a year to go on co-op somewhere around the world. Antioch College's second year students (the class of 2018) recently returned from co-op and shared their experiences during a special edition of Community Meeting called Co-op Swap. WYSO hosted the event with Juliet Fromholt moderating the discussion, and WYSO Miller Fellow Mari Smith recorded the students' responses.

On this day, Antioch's 'solar sheep' move in a line formation, chomping and chewing on tufts of tall grass around acres of solar array panels.
Jerry Kenney

At Antioch College, there are solar array fields with solar panels that soak up the sun and convert it to energy for the college to use. These have been around for a couple of years, and have worked extremely well for the college. For a few years on the Antioch College Farm, sheep have been raised for meat for consumption in the dining halls. This year, Antioch College implemented a new program where they combined these two things together, the solar array and the sheep, to make a pilot program to cut down on fossil fuel emissions.

Odette Chavez-Mayo

On September 28, the class of 2019 arrived on Antioch’s campus. This is the first class that didn’t receive a full Horace Mann Scholarship, but a half scholarship.  Yet due to an anonymous donation worth over $1 million, Antioch extended full tuition to a group of first-generation college students and environmental science majors. These environmental science majors are called LEAF (Leadership in the Environment at Antioch Fellowship) Scholars.  I had never heard of them until we had co-existed on Antioch’s campus together for several weeks so I decided to find out: Who are they?

Antioch College Names New President

Nov 18, 2015

On Wednesday, Antioch College announced that Dr. Thomas “Tom” Manley will serve as the school's president beginning in March 2016.

courtesy of The Record

A large group of Antioch College students and staff members gathered in front of the campus Thursday afternoon to show solidarity with students at the University of Missouri who have accused the administration there of ignoring alleged acts of racism on campus.

Antioch student Marcell Vanarsdale thinks that students at the campus are united in standing up against racism. He was happy to see such a large turnout of Antioch students at the rally.

courtesy of Antioch College

When Antioch College re-opened its doors in 2011, it admitted a small group of individuals on a scholarship that covered their tuition for all four years. When the class of 2015 entered Antioch, they brought the flesh and blood to a bare-boned campus with only two functioning buildings. Over four years, the class of 2015 shrank, changed, and experienced a wild rollercoaster ride as Antioch College grew, pulled itself up by its bootstraps, made new rules, and started its accreditation process.

Antioch College Farm Manager, Kat Christen, introduces a the farm's latest employees - sheep brought in to help with grounds maintenance under the solar arrays.
Jerry Kenney

Three conservation efforts taking place at Antioch College represent their long standing goal of becoming more sustainable. In this excerpt from WYSO Weekend, we highlight these efforts:

Up first, the college and Glen Helen Nature Preserve in Yellow Springs have secured a second land conservation easement that will forever protect 973 acres of the preserve. To get more details on the easement we spoke to Nick Boutis, Executive Director of the Glen Helen Ecology Institute.

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