WYSO

Antioch College

Celebrating its second year, Ohayo Ohio is a Japanese Symposium and Cultural Event at Antioch College.  As part of the weekend's activities, Antioch alumni, students and friends will participate in Walking Heaven and Hell, An Evening of Japanese Theater And Dance, and some of those performers joined WYSO's Niki Dakota live in the studio to talk about the performance. 

In October, Antioch College will host a Restorative Justice (RJ) symposium called "Healing Harms In Today's Troubled World. Organizers say the symposium will look at two broader topics: how RJ can be/is used in  higher eduction, and how RJ can be/is used to heal harms in a community.

This is a national conference designed to teach the principles and practices of Restorative Justice and its approach to problem solving.

In an interview with WYSO this week, Jalyn Roe, one of the organizers of the symposium, talks about the reasons behind the summit and offers details on how to get involved.

Antioch College

In 1968 an eighteen-year-old youth named Bill Newman arrived in Yellow Springs to begin his freshman year at Antioch College. Bill's first Antioch co-op education experience took place in New York City. He was supposed to return to Antioch after three months but the experience he was having in New York was so thrilling and important to him that he ended up staying away for nine months.

The Antioch Review recently published 2 special editions of the magazine to mark the 75th anniversary of the publication. AR editor Robert Fogarty returned to the program to talk about the history of the Review and how it has changed over the years.

In Transition: The Antioch Word Goes To Cuba

May 5, 2017
Lucas Bautista

Last quarter, The Word recorded Antioch’s Co-op Swap. If you’re not familiar with it, Co-op Swap is an event at which students who just came back from their respective co-ops share their experiences and answer questions from the audience. In past episodes, we have heard stories from all the panelists. But this time, we decided to zero in on the co-op story from Malka Berro '18 and Lucas Bautista '18.  

Dr. Jonathan Winkler, Chair of the History Department at Wright State University is interviewed by Rediscovered Radio producer Jocelyn Robinson
Will Davis / WYSO

Today on Rediscovered Radio, we return to early May 1971, when huge demonstrations were held in Washington DC, to protest the war in Viet Nam.  The organizers believed that more peaceful protest methods of the past weren’t working.  Theirs was a more radical agenda. 

For three days, protestors blocked intersections and bridges in DC, intending to shut down the federal government.  The Nixon administration reacted with force, and on the third day brought in ten thousand federal troops.  More than 12,000 demonstrators were eventually arrested.

Tom Amrhein

In last episode of the Antioch Word, we explored community through Toni Jonas Silver’s Community Voices story about Gene the rat. This episode continues to look at the things that bring us all together, but this time, it’s about a place. Community Voices producer Frank Fortino ’17 takes us to the Emporium in Yellow Springs.

Through Antioch College Media Arts

The 1966 film Black Girl from director Ousmane Sembène, will be shown at the Little Art Theatre in Yellow Springs on March 4th. Sembene is considered the father of African cinema and in this WYSO Weekend extra, Assistant Professor of Media Arts at Antioch College, Charles Fairbanks, tells us a little bit about the director and the Film.

 

 

More information from Antioch College:

courtesy of Ruthie Lane

Antioch’s year-round schedule is sometimes grueling, and always exhausting. However, it also creates space for variation and diversity that more typical models don’t always facilitate. In this vein, The Word is undergoing a few changes. Episodes will now feature projects from people in the Antioch community such as students, staff, and faculty. We also remixed the theme song!

The Living in Divided States exhibit has been in display at Antioch College's Herndon Gallery since December.  It explores concepts of diversity and division in post-election America through a variety of art forms and activities. 

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