Antioch College

courtesy of Antioch College

When Antioch College re-opened its doors in 2011, it admitted a small group of individuals on a scholarship that covered their tuition for all four years. When the class of 2015 entered Antioch, they brought the flesh and blood to a bare-boned campus with only two functioning buildings. Over four years, the class of 2015 shrank, changed, and experienced a wild rollercoaster ride as Antioch College grew, pulled itself up by its bootstraps, made new rules, and started its accreditation process.

Antioch College Farm Manager, Kat Christen, introduces a the farm's latest employees - sheep brought in to help with grounds maintenance under the solar arrays.
Jerry Kenney

Three conservation efforts taking place at Antioch College represent their long standing goal of becoming more sustainable. In this excerpt from WYSO Weekend, we highlight these efforts:

Up first, the college and Glen Helen Nature Preserve in Yellow Springs have secured a second land conservation easement that will forever protect 973 acres of the preserve. To get more details on the easement we spoke to Nick Boutis, Executive Director of the Glen Helen Ecology Institute.

The "yellow springs" in Glen Helen Nature Preserve.
C.J. Geiger / Flickr/Creative Commons

Antioch College and Glen Helen Nature Preserve in Yellow Springs have secured a second land conservation easement that will forever protect 973 acres of the preserve. The first easement, was announced in February, 2015.

Communications Director at Antioch, Matt Desjardins, calls the easement a big deal and something that has remained a priority even as the college seeks to regain it's accreditation.

courtesy of Antiochiana

August 6, 2015 marks the 70th anniversary of the Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. When the bombs were dropped, the world was both awestruck and horrified by their destructive power.  And while some worked to further develop them and harness their immense nuclear energy, others dedicated themselves to preventing more tragedies from happening. Earle and Barbara Reynolds were two of these people. The former Yellow Springs residents and their family protested nuclear development in a unique - and dangerous way.

courtesy of Antioch College

Mark Roosevelt is an avid reader. He reads widely and deeply. Books are an important part of his life. In this essay collection Roosevelt reflects upon his reading life and offers readers some insights into some of the things which have stoked his passion for great literature.

Mark Roosevelt is the president of Antioch College in Yellow Springs, which holds WYSO's license.

courtesy of Antioch College

In this special presentation of highlights from Antioch College’s 2015 commencement ceremony, you'll hear reflections in words and music from graduating students, alumni, community members and commencement speaker Dr. Clarence Jones. 

Antioch College Alums Participate In Volunteer Work Project On Campus

Jun 21, 2015

This weekend marked Antioch College's first commencement since closing and reopening four years ago. The many festivities included major work projects taken on by Antioch alums. 

The Antioch volunteer work project was started in 1986. But in 2008, the school closing brought alumni in droves who wanted to get the school back up running. Now more than ever, the campus is dependent on alumni's help to rebuild...the work they put in four times a year is valued at over 100 thousand dollars of labor. And the work projects can be fun as well.  

What Is Pickleball? The Antioch Word Hits The Court

May 18, 2015
Odette Chavez-Mayo

In the Antioch College Wellness Center, there is a game called pickleball, and if you frequent the gyms as well as Studio B, you could stumble onto a game. A bright green ball whizzes back and forth as it is hit, and the noise echoes and cracks off of the walls.  Pickleball is gaining popularity at the Wellness Center, and Ellie Burck went to the Antioch and Yellow Springs community to learn more about the sport.

At a community meeting, Antioch College President, Mark Roosevelt annouces the receipt of several large funding grants, and his decision to leave the college after his contract expires.
Jerry Kenney

On Tuesday, Antioch College announced it has received two large grants totaling 7 million dollars. The gift includes a one million dollar grant from an anonymous donor, and a $6 million grant from the Morgan Family Foundation, the largest gift the College has received since its 2009 revival and separation from Antioch University. 

At a community meeting announcing the grant, Antioch College President, Mark Roosevelt said the large donation was a vote of confidence from the foundation.

Maziar Bahari is a journalist, film maker and human rights activist from Iran. His work landed him in an Iranian prison for several month’s in 2009. His memoir Then They Came for Me was the basis for The Daily Show host, Jon Stewart's 2014 film Rosewater. In 2014 Bahari produced and directed the documentary film To Light a Candle about the persecution of Bahá'ís in Iran. 

To find out more about the film and its maker, WYSO's Jerry Kenney spoke with Dr. Jim Malarky, Chair of Humanities at Antioch University.