Air Force

SSGT Alex Lloyd/Wikimedia Commons

The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in southwest Ohio wants to add a current Air Force One to its collection.

The Dayton Daily News reports a new $40.8 million hangar at the museum near Dayton opens on Wednesday and officials say they've designed the 224,000-square-foot building with the idea of landing the presidential aircraft.

Museum historian Jeff Underwood says the facility has a "pretty good shot" at landing one of the two current VC-25s. That's the name designated for the planes.

Dan Patterson

The Dayton Development Coalition (DDC) has announced its list of priority projects for government funding requests for the year, with some pretty futuristic Air Force research at the top of the list.

Every year the coalition brings together a committee to decide on projects to advocate for in efforts to get state and federal money into the region. The goal is to unite the region around priority projects in areas including defense, health care and transportation.

"Patches" is one of the C-123 cargo planes used to spray Agent Orange. It's now on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The Department of Veterans Affairs is now saying that Air Force reservists who became ill after being exposed to Agent Orange residue while working on planes after the Vietnam War should be eligible for disability benefits.

The VA says it's been working to finalize a rule that could cover more than 2,000 military personnel who flew or worked on Fairchild C-123 aircraft from 1972 to 1982. Many of the planes were used to spray Agent Orange in Vietnam.

wright-patterson air force base gates
Flickr Creative Commons user soundfromwayout

Ohio's largest U.S military base has lost the competition to become the site of a new installation and mission support center that could result in hundreds of jobs for the host base.

Wright-Patterson Air Force Base was one of four final candidates for the Air Force Installation and Mission Support Center Headquarters. Air Force officials said in a statement Wednesday that Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland in Texas was selected as the site of the new center.

The other bases competing were Joint Base-Langley-Eustis in Virginia and Scott Air Force Base in Illinois.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Thursday is the second day of meetings at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base for small businesses in the defense industry. The event is part of an effort on the part of the Air Force to work more with small contractors; base officials say it helps them stay efficient as the government cuts defense budgets.

Those cuts have been bad news for local industry, which provides the Air Force with everything from computer systems to research to airplane parts—but not all contractors are feeling the same pain.

Large contractors cash in

Two Dayton-Area Companies Win Big Defense Contracts

Apr 2, 2014

The US Air Force has awarded a major contract to two Dayton companies, Matrix Research and Lion-Vallen Industries.

Dayton-area contractors are getting business despite cuts to the overall military budget.

Matrix Research develops sensors and high-tech materials—in this case, for stealth military aircraft. The company will get $45,085,000 to work on improving the the Air Force fleet through marginal technology upgrades; the award was announced Friday by the Air Force Institute of Technology based at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.

NASIC Gets New Commander

Mar 26, 2014

The U.S. Air Force has announced a new commander for the National Air and Space Intelligence Center (NASIC). Colonel Leah Lauderback will replace Colonel Aaron M. Prupas as NASIC’s next commander.

Lauderback is currently the commander of the 67th Cyberspace Operations Group, which is responsible for offensive cyber attacks on the part of the Air Force.

Members of a national commission studying the U.S. Air Force to see if structural changes are needed will visit Ohio military bases this week seeking information.

The commission says members will visit Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton on Monday. They also plan to collect information at Air National Guard bases including Springfield, Rickenbacker and Mansfield-Lahm during their three-day Ohio stop.

The U.S. Air Force's grounding of its Thunderbirds jet demonstration team means the planes won't be headlining this summer's Dayton Air Show.

It's not a surprise. The Air Force earlier announced that it planned to ground the Thunderbirds April 1 if a federal budget deal wasn't reached.

Organizers of the popular Dayton Air Show made the Thunderbirds' cancelation official in a release Thursday.

The air show is scheduled to go on June 22 and 23 with 14 other aerial acts.

The Air Force says the cancelation of a computer modernization program will cost 115 contract employees their jobs at Wright-Patterson Air Force base.

Base spokesman Daryl Mayer said Thursday that cancelation of the Expeditionary Combat Support System program also means that an additional 55 civilian and military employees will be reassigned from that program.

Mayer says the canceled program had been intended to replace some older computer systems to meet statutory requirements for financial and audit readiness mandated by Congress.