Abortion

Abortions By Ohio Women Are At An All-time Low

Nov 27, 2012

The Ohio Department of Health reports that induced abortions dropped 12 percent last year, hitting the lowest number since the state started tracking them 35 years ago.

The Akron Beacon Journal reports that abortions have fallen in Ohio each year since 2000. Experts attribute it to a variety of factors, including increased use of birth control, better access to health care and improved health education.

The number of overall Ohio births also has fallen, 16.5 percent from 1990 to 2010.

An Ohio house committee has recommended a bill that would re-prioritize funding for family planning services so that Planned Parenthood would be last on the list.

An Ohio House committee is scheduled to take a possible vote on a bill that could put Planned Parenthood in the back of the line when it comes to money for family planning services. That’s just one of the bills that lawmakers will likely consider in the coming lame duck session of the Ohio legislature.

As the 40th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the US Supreme Court case legalizing abortion, approaches, many Americans assume that legalized abortion is only as old as that ruling. In fact, as Anna Peterson discusses this month, abortion had only been made illegal at the turn of the 20th century. The different histories of abortion in Europe and the United States reveal much about the current state of American debates-so prominent in the 2012 elections campaigns-over abortion and women's health.

Democrats in the Ohio legislature are angry about a proposal that’s been slipped into a budget adjustment bill. The proposal would strip away money from Planned Parenthoods throughout Ohio.

House Republicans in Ohio are pursuing a proposal that targets abortion providers like Planned Parenthood while directing public health care dollars to other programs that help uninsured and underinsured women.

To avoid constitutional issues, lawmakers placed Planned Parenthood at the back of the line for money rather than defunding it entirely.

Bill Cohen from Ohio Public Radio joins Emily McCord for PoliticsOhio to discuss the Quinnipiac poll results from this week. Cohen reports that Ohioans fall along party lines regarding support for the so-called "heartbeat bill". Another poll finds that Ohioans overwhelmingly support natural oil and gas drilling for economic reasons over the environment, yet they do want a moratorium on fracking. Cohen addresses the possible reasons behind Governor Kasich's announcement to hold to State of the State address outside of the statehouse.

The Quinnipiac University poll poses this: There’s a bill before the state legislature that would ban abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detectable, usually 6 to 8 weeks into pregnancy.  Do you support or oppose this bill?  Forty five percent of Ohioans say they support it and 46 percent say they oppose it. 

Backers of the proposed bill that would outlaw abortion in Ohio at the point where a fetal heartbeat could be detected are trying a new tactic to get state senators to move the bill forward. They brought young children to the Statehouse and gave them teddy bears that made the sound of a fetal heartbeat. The children then took those bears to Senators who are considering the so called heartbeat bill. One of its major backers, Janet Folger Porter, said she thinks the group’s efforts are working.

The sponsor of an Ohio bill that would impose the nation's most stringent abortion limit has taken responsibility for some confusion over proposed changes to the measure that caused hearings on the bill to be suspended last month.

A Dec. 15 letter written by state Rep. Lynn Wachtmann sheds new light on the sudden hold that was put on the divisive legislation dubbed the "heartbeat bill." The measure cleared the Ohio House in June. Backers had believed it was headed toward passage in the Senate before the holiday break.

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