Abortion

A bill that seeks to divert more than $1 million in government funding away from Planned Parenthood has cleared the Ohio House.

Backers say the proposal targets grants Planned Parenthood receives through Ohio's health department. The public dollars - mostly federal money - support initiatives including HIV testing, breast and cervical cancer screenings and prevention of violence against women.

An Ohio bill that aims to divert more than $1 million in government money away from Planned Parenthood has passed the state Senate after Democrats and other opponents claimed it threatens access to health care services.
 
The proposal targets grants that the organization receives through the Ohio Department of Health. The taxpayer dollars support initiatives for HIV testing, breast and cervical cancer screenings, prevention of violence against women and others.
 

The Women's Med Center in Dayton's south suburbs is routinely picketed by abortion opponents.
Samuel Worley / WYSO

A federal judge has ruled the last two abortion clinics in southwest Ohio can remain open while fighting to keep their state operating licenses.

Court documents show a federal judge in Cincinnati issued the preliminary injunction Tuesday. The clinics sought the ruling in their lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of abortion restrictions approved in the two most recent state budgets.

A NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio statement says those restrictions are medically unnecessary.

Lawmakers scrapped Gov. Kasich's proposal that would have given schools less money.
User: Thoth188 / Flickr/Creative Commons

Anti-abortion activists are pushing for two state proposals that would defund Planned Parenthood.

The House version of the proposal to take state funds from Planned Parenthood had its first hearing last week, where joint sponsor Bill Patmon of Cleveland said it ensures that state money won’t be used to perform elective abortions or that the state will contract with entities that do. 

“Planned Parenthood is not mentioned anywhere in this," he said. "If the shoe fits, however, please wear it.”

The Women's Med Center in Dayton's south suburbs is routinely picketed by abortion opponents.
Samuel Worley / WYSO

Planned Parenthood Southwest Ohio (PPSWO) and the Women's Med Group have filed a lawsuit against the Ohio Department of Health (ODH). The lawsuit challenges the constitutionality of abortion restrictions in the two most recent state budgets.

Dayton Right to Life will take part in a National Day of Protest Against Planned Parenthood on Saturday. The effort is being lead by a coalition of national pro-life groups. The local organization will hold a rally outside the Planned Parenthood health center on N. Wilkinson St. downtown.

The Women's Med Center in Dayton's south suburbs is routinely picketed by abortion opponents.
Samuel Worley / WYSO

Abortion clinics in Dayton and Toledo might be forced to close by tightening state regulations. New provisions in the governor’s budget signed into law Tuesday evening could make it harder for abortion providers to stay open.

Ohio Budget Passes Senate, Heads To House For Friday Vote

Jun 25, 2015

State senators on Thursday passed a sweeping $71.2 billion, two-year budget that provides an income tax cut for Ohioans, funds public schools and seeks to change health care policies.
 
The House is planning to vote on the measure Friday. The deadline for Republican Gov. John Kasich to sign the bill into law is Tuesday. Some things to know as the measure moves toward his desk:
 
     EDUCATION:
 

The bill that would ban abortion at the first detectable fetal heartbeat has been introduced three times in four years, and it appears to have its best shot at passing this time around.

Abortion Rights Group Sues Ohio Health Agency For Records

Jan 6, 2015

An abortion rights group wants the Ohio Supreme Court to order the state's health department to release public records detailing certain communication between the agency and an anti-abortion organization.

The Dec. 24 lawsuit claims the department is wrongfully withholding records showing phone calls and emails between Ohio Right to Life leaders and state health officials. The case stems from a public records request that NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio made in late October.

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