WYSO

WYSO Weekend

Sunday, 10-10:30am

Welcome to WYSO Weekend where every Sunday morning, host Jerry Kenney brings you highlights from the week's news, issues, interviews, arts and cultural events from across the Miami Valley.  You'll also hear the latest stories from WYSO Community Voices producers, and features from Dayton Youth Radio, Senior Voices, County Lines and other series. 
 

When President Trump declared the opioid epidemic a national public health emergency, it came with a regulation change meant to ease provider shortage. It allows doctors to prescribe addiction medicine virtually, without ever seeing the patient in person. In Indiana, this has been legal since early 2017 but, as Side Effects Public Media’s Emily Forman reports, it’s complicated.

Entrepreneur Magazine reports that revenue from food trucks has nearly tripled, from $960 million to $2.7 billion, nationally over the last five years. And here in the Miami Valley, food trucks have become commonplace. Jayne Monat of Yellow Springs asked WYSO about the impact of Dayton area food trucks on the local economy in comparison with brick and mortar restaurants For this installment of WYSO Curious, we sent Community Voices producer Jason Reynolds out to eat.

Across the country, many school districts are grappling with declining enrollment. Many of these districts are opting to shutter schools in an effort to save money and consolidate resources. This is despite conflicting research on the benefits of school closures. Now, Dayton may be next.  In December, DPS leaders revealed many district schools are operating at under 50-percent capacity. Officials launched a task force to help decide the fate of Dayton’s emptiest school buildings –– many of them on the West Side.

Dayton Public Schools reached a separation agreement with superintendent Rhonda Corr this week. The district is paying Corr to step down.

More than 200 Springfield residents packed into a high school cafeteria for a public hearing Thursday night. Many came to comment on an Ohio Environmental Protection Agency permit application.  The permit would allow mining company Enon Sand and Gravel to dump treated wastewater into a tributary of the nearby Mud Run.

Wright State University faculty members say they are willing to go on strike if a fair contract can’t be negotiated.  Several hundred professors and supportive students gathered for a rally on campus before marching to a scheduled community forum, where Wright State president Cheryl Schrader and university trustees addressed budget concerns.

 

Montgomery County has some of the highest rates of infant mortality in the country. The problem affects African Americans -- at all income and education levels --most often. WYSOs Jess Mador introduces us to a Dayton public-health campaign to address that. Then Mador's report continues with a look at how state health officials are promoting visiting nurses to help reduce Ohio’s infant mortality rate, which is much higher than the national rate, despite progress in preventing sleep-related infant deaths.

This week on Dayton Youth Radio we have the first of two stories about teenagers dealing with the Opioid Crisis. Today we'll hear from Megan Johnson, a senior at Centerville High School. *Support for Dayton Youth Radio comes from the Virginia W. Kettering Foundation and the Ohio Arts Council.

 

In this edition of WYSO Weekend:

 

Dayton community members are rallying to support Oregon District businesses after a fire New Years’ weekend. The fire broke out in the kitchen of Salar Restaurant and Lounge, which was heavily damaged. Smoke also affected other nearby shops. I talked to one proprietor about his experience last weekend.

In this edition of WYSO Weekend:

The Dayton Convention Center’s future is in question after city leaders announced plans this past week to create a task force to assess the condition of the facility, its finances and future development potential. City leaders say the decision follows a feasibility study conducted last year by Crossroads Consulting Services. In our interview with Dayton’s Deputy City Manager - Joe Parlette - he says the Tampa (FL) based company, reported that the convention center needed major renovations that could cost millions.

 

In this edition of WYSO Weekend:

Thousands of West Dayton residents who lack easy access to fresh fruits and vegetables could soon have a full-service food market close to home. The west side has been without a convenient source of fresh produce since 2008, when a neighborhood Kroger grocery store shut down. Since then, city officials have tried attracting a new grocer without success. The story could have ended there. But now, nearly 10 years later, one community group plans to open a co-operative grocery store called Gem City Market. Advocates say it will finally bring healthier food back to the west side.  WYSO’s April Laissle reports.


Pages