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Dead Stop
3:40 am
Tue August 14, 2012

A Wild Resting Place For Gunslingers And Cowboys

The Boot Hill cemetery in Tombstone, Ariz., is filled with the graves of men who met their end in the Wild West. While there are many such cemeteries in the Western U.S., Tombstone's is considered the most famous.
Ted Robbins NPR

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 9:03 am

If you're from a state once considered the "Old West," odds are you've heard of a Boot Hill graveyard. Turns out there are a number of Boot Hill cemeteries in the West, so named because many of their inhabitants died violently — with their boots on.

But of all the Boot Hill cemeteries, none is as famous as Boot Hill in Tombstone, Ariz.

It's a tough-looking place. No lawn, just gravel, mesquite trees and cactus. The graves are covered with stones to keep varmints from digging up the bones.

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Around the Nation
3:33 am
Tue August 14, 2012

La. Court In Racially Charged Power Struggle, Again

Justice Bernette Johnson is at the center of a legal battle over whether she will be the next chief justice of the Louisiana Supreme Court.
Louisiana Supreme Court AP

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 5:00 am

A power struggle on the Louisiana Supreme Court is headed to federal court this week. Lawyers are seeking to reopen an old voting rights case that gave the Deep South state its first black Supreme Court justice. What's at stake in the racially charged fight is whether Louisiana will now have its first African-American chief justice.

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All Tech Considered
3:33 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Despite Layoffs, Google's Motorola Strategy Aims At Innovation

Google's Android 3.0 Honeycomb OS is demonstrated on a Motorola Xoon tablet during a media event at Google headquarters on Feb. 2, 2011. Google acquired Motorola Mobility in August 2011 for $12.5 billion.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 5:18 pm

Google is shaking things up at its new subsidiary Motorola Mobility, announcing Monday that it will lay off 20 percent of the company's global workforce. Its strategy is to create a small division led by a technology star to spur innovation at the company that invented the cellphone.

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Reporter's Notebook
3:29 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Through Thick And Thin, Simmons Still 'Sweatin'

Fitness advocate Richard Simmons, wearing his signature shorts and tank top, leads Capitol Hill staff and visitors through an exercise routine July 24, 2008, in Washington, D.C.
Tim Sloan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 5:20 pm

NPR producer Sam Sanders headed to Beverly Hills, Calif., recently to see longtime fitness guru Richard Simmons in action and find out how he has been at it so long. He sent this reporter's notebook of his encounter with the man who's been helping people lose weight for nearly 40 years.

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Million-Dollar Donors
3:26 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Melons, Squash, Cash: A Million-Dollar Donor Sprouts

Amy Goldman, known for her gardens and her illustrated coffee-table books about plants, has donated $1 million to a pro-Obama superPAC.
Sandi Fellman

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 2:22 pm

Amy Goldman is best known as the author of lavish books about heirloom tomatoes, squash and melons. Now Goldman is trying to cultivate a second term for President Obama.

Goldman wrote a check for $1 million to a pro-Obama superPAC — and gave another million to the political arm of Planned Parenthood.

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