History Talk from Origins

Leticia Wiggins and Patrick Potyondy

Smart conversations about today’s most interesting topics - a history podcast for everyone, produced by Ohio State's Origins: Current Events in Historical Perspective.

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Origins Podcast
12:06 pm
Tue May 15, 2012

Humanitarian Intervention: The American Experience from William McKinley to Barack Obama

In the late 19th century, humanitarian intervention was a popular idea among U.S. citizens. In this detail from a political cartoon, a caring woman whose garment reads "liberty" symbolizes this impulse.

Many of us think of humanitarian intervention as a recent phenomenon of United States foreign policy. Certainly, critics of Barack Obama’s intervention in Libya saw America’s humanitarian involvement there as some new-fangled excuse to go mucking around in other countries. This month historian Jeff Bloodworth traces a much longer history of humanitarian intervention that goes back to the administration of William McKinley and is connected with the Protestant ideals of some of the nation's founders.

Origins Podcast
10:00 am
Sun April 15, 2012

Climate, Human Population and Human Survival: What the Deep Past Tells Us about the Future

The melting of glaciers due to global warming is threatening fresh water supplies to human populations in a number of regions. Shown here: Canada's Athabasca Glacier.

The controversies generated by climate science in recent years center around the human relationship with the natural world and with natural resources. This month, historian John Brooke puts that critical question in historical perspective—deep historical perspective. For most of human history, our species had to struggle to survive powerful natural forces, like climate and disease. In the past three centuries, however, things have changed dramatically: that struggle has been reshaped by the unprecedented growth of the human population—from under one billion to now over seven.

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Military
10:00 am
Thu March 15, 2012

A Century of U.S. Relations with Iraq

The statue of Saddam Hussein topples in Baghdad's Firdos Square on April 9, 2003.

As the American combat mission in Iraq comes to end, the Obama administration and Pentagon officials have repeatedly assured the world that American involvement with Iraq will continue. They are undoubtedly right. Since the founding of Iraq in the aftermath of World War I, U.S. policy has included cooperation, confrontation, war, and, most recently, an ongoing experiment in state-building. This month, Peter Hahn, an expert on the history of U.S.

Origins Podcast
9:00 am
Wed February 15, 2012

"Y'En A Marre!" (We're Fed Up!): Senegal in the Season of Discontent

In Senegal, a protester holds a sign rejecting "monarchy" in the form of proposed changes to the constitution which would extend the current president's term in office. The author was researching in Dakar when major protests broke out;

In the summer of 2011, the streets of Dakar, Senegal filled with a mass of demonstrators “fed up” with the political machinations of President Abdoulaye Wade. Led by popular rappers, the oppositional collective “Y’En A Marre” became spokespeople for a generation at the end of their rope. As Senegal approaches critical elections in February 2012, historian James Genova offers an eyewitness account of these political upheavals, placing the current turmoil in its broader historical and African context.

Origins Podcast
9:00 am
Sun January 15, 2012

Re-Mapping American Politics: The Redistricting Revolution Fifty Years Later

The 1812 political cartoon that led to the coining of the term Gerrymander.

Alongside the Presidential nomination process, the most prominent American political news stories these days are about the heated, high-stakes struggles over redistricting. The modern era of reapportioning state and federal legislative districts began almost exactly a half century ago when the U.S. Supreme Court decided Baker v. Carr (1962).

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