WYSO

History Talk from Origins

  • Hosted by Jessica Blissit and Brenna Miller

Smart conversations about today’s most interesting topics - a history podcast for everyone, produced by Ohio State's Origins: Current Events in Historical Perspective.

Click here for more information.

History Talk: Shifting Borders - The Many Sides of U.S.-Mexican Relations

Jul 20, 2017

Long before the recent initiatives to strengthen the border wall with Mexico and contentious debates surrounding immigration and deportation, the U.S. and Mexico have had a tangled history of both animosity and cooperation. From the Texas Revolution and the Mexican-American War to the signing of the North American Free Trade Agreement, what can history tell us about the current state of affairs and prospects for the future between the U.S. and Mexico? Join us as hosts Brenna Miller and Jessica Blissit discuss U.S.-Mexican relations with three experts: Dr. Elena Albarran, Dr.

History Talk: Russia and the World

Jun 16, 2017

In recent years, Russia has gained prominence on the world stage. From hosting the 2014 Winter Olympics, to regional interventions, to allegations of interference in foreign elections, the country's international activities suggest that its leadership is on a mission to shape world affairs. But what exactly does Russia want? And how does this compare to its ambitions in the past?

Fault Lines: The Urban-Rural Divide in America

May 7, 2017

Today, urban and rural areas seem more distant than ever. Pitted against one another on a range of economic, political and social issues, many attributed the outcome of the 2016 election to the frustrations of just 15% of rural American voters. But is the divide that clear? Are the differences that stark? And are conflicts between rural and urban areas a new phenomenon?

The Equal Rights Amendment: Then and Now

Apr 9, 2017

In March 2017 Nevada became the first state in 40 years to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment—a provision written to address discrimination on the basis of sex. Now, in an atmosphere of renewed national attention on issues affecting women, this proposed amendment could be just two states short of addition to the United States Constitution.

Caged: Humans and Animals at the Zoo

Mar 22, 2017

Zoos are some of the world’s most visited attractions. Yet they often make headlines for controversial reasons such as in 2016 when the Cincinnati Zoo shot and killed a gorilla after a child fell into the animal’s enclosure or in 2017 when poachers killed a rhinoceros at a Paris Zoo for its horns. While schoolchildren and adults alike may delight at the prospect of a trip to the zoo, historically zoos have represented far more than a fun way to spend an afternoon.

Native Sovereignty and the Dakota Access Pipeline

Feb 11, 2017

As the struggle between members of the Standing Rock Reservation and their allies against the Dakota Access Pipeline continues, History Talk takes a look at the long-term patterns of Native American relations with the U.S. government.

The Greening of China?

Jan 22, 2017

As the world considers how to respond to climate change, China has emerged as the great paradox. With its fast-growing economy, China has become the leading producer of CO2 (though not on a per-capita basis). Simultaneously, it has become the world's leading producer of green and renewable energy.

History Talk: North Korea - The Myth of a Hermit Kingdom

Dec 15, 2016

In this episode of History Talk, hosts Brenna Miller and Jessica Blissit speak with three experts on North Korea: Deborah Solomon, Mitchell Lerner, and Youngbae Hwang.

History Talk: America's Post-Election Political Landscape

Nov 18, 2016

In this episode of History Talk, hosts Jessica Blissit and Brenna Miller interview three experts on American politics—Kimberly Hamlin, Marc Horger, and Paula Baker—in the wake of the 2016 presidential election.

History Talk: Hooked - Drugs, Prohibition, and American Cities

Oct 17, 2016

Since the 1970s, the "War on Drugs" has absorbed billions of dollars, fueled armed interventions overseas, imprisoned millions of individuals, and stigmatized inner city communities--all without appearing to have produced a measurable impact on actual drug use.

Pages