Community Voices

What’s In Those Trains? WYSO Curious Tracks Down The Cargo

Sep 24, 2015
trains rails
Lauren Shows / WYSO

Lyle Whybrew has lived his whole life to the sounds of passing trains. He grew up in North Judson, Indiana, a town where four railroad lines converged, and now he’s in Tipp City.

Dayton Metro Library Operations Center Gives New Life To Hauer Music Building

Sep 16, 2015
An employee installs cameras on exterior of new north stair tower at the Hauer Music Building
Marika Snider / WYSO

A new Dayton Public Library Operations Center is about to open in the former Hauer Music Building. In 2012, the passage of the $187 million Libraries for a Smarter Future levy began an enormous construction and remodeling campaign of the entire Dayton Metro Library System.

kthompson84 / Flickr Creative Commons

Can online lists impact us in ways we don’t understand? Are there real world fallouts to being one of the “ten worst” or “ten best”? Community Voices producer Dan Gummel takes a closer look at clickbait.

We’ve all seen those online lists: “The Top Ten Unhappiest Cities in The U.S.” or “The Ten Most Miserable Places to Live in 2015”. Here in the WYSO listening area several cities including Cincinnati, Dayton and Springfield have been named to lists claiming they are unhappy, or dying. But are these lists really accurate?


World House Choir To Perform Mass for Mother Earth

Sep 9, 2015
Dorothy Smith

What happens when a choir director and 100 singers focus on climate change? This weekend, the World House Choir will present Missa Gaia: A Celebration of Mother Earth by Paul Winter. The music is both meditative and a call to action.

Local Artists Find Their Creative Space

Sep 2, 2015
Marika Snider / WYSO

For part-time artists, juggling career, home, and family can be challenging. Some find the solution in a Third Space, a place where their talents can mature. Community Voices producer Marika Snider talks with two local artists about finding their Third Space.

Jeff Hiles / WYSO

College students are surrounded by technology inside and outside of the classroom. And increasingly educators are reaching learners through smart phones and laptops.

Dan Gummel / WYSO

This summer Project Jericho, a non-profit housed at Clark State in Springfield, hosted a free arts camp for local youth. They hired professional artists from around the country to teach.

Ron Solada / WYSO

College Promise provides a free college education for academically gifted children from poverty impacted families here in Montgomery County. The initiative started 4 years ago and now has over 250 children selected from area middle schools on the path to a free college education, starting at Sinclair Community College and finishing at schools like Miami University, Wright State University and University of Dayton.

courtesy of Antiochiana

August 6, 2015 marks the 70th anniversary of the Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. When the bombs were dropped, the world was both awestruck and horrified by their destructive power.  And while some worked to further develop them and harness their immense nuclear energy, others dedicated themselves to preventing more tragedies from happening. Earle and Barbara Reynolds were two of these people. The former Yellow Springs residents and their family protested nuclear development in a unique - and dangerous way.

Faculty, Administrators Reflect On Student Unrest At Wilberforce In The 1960s

Jul 29, 2015
courtesy of Yvonne Seon

In the late 1960s, black students on college campuses around the country were at the vanguard of protest to bring about change in the world around them. While there is an extensive record of student views of these activities, we rarely hear the perspectives of faculty and administrators who worked at these campuses. Community Voices producer Kevin McGruder looks at the challenges facing faculty and administrators during times of student unrest on the campus of Wilberforce University in the late 1960s.