All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4 - 6:30pm and Weekends, 5 - 6pm

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187fa9ae1c83ba774fd2a55|5187fa87e1c83ba774fd29f8

Pages

Why Music Matters
2:23 pm
Sun May 13, 2012

Stop The Music: A Dancer Tries Silence

Amy O'Neal, a modern dance choreographer, recently took on the challenge of performing without music.
Gabriel Bienczycki Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 10:24 am

Weekends on All Things Considered continues its "Why Music Matters" series with stories of music fans, told in their own words. Today's story is about Amy O'Neal, a choreographer who took on the challenge of dancing in complete silence.

Read more
History
5:38 pm
Sat May 12, 2012

How Teddy Saved Football

Originally published on Sat May 12, 2012 6:05 pm

Football is a violent game, but a century ago it used to be a lethal pastime. NPR's Tom Goldman explains how President Teddy Roosevelt stepped in and forced the establishment of new rules that made the game safer.

NPR Story
5:20 pm
Sat May 12, 2012

Same-Sex Marriage Back In National Spotlight

Originally published on Sat May 12, 2012 6:05 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

From NPR News, it's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Guy Raz.

For three days now, Mitt Romney's campaign has tried to steer the national conversation back to the economy. But the pressure to respond to President Obama's announcement in support of gay marriage has been intense. And this morning at a speech to students at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia, Romney definitively spoke out.

MITT ROMNEY: Marriage is a relationship between one man and one woman.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

Read more
Author Interviews
5:17 pm
Sat May 12, 2012

The 12 Days Of Disaster That Made Modern Chicago

Originally published on Sat May 12, 2012 6:05 pm

In 1919, Chicago was called the "youngest great city in the world." World War I had just come to a close, troops were coming home, industry was booming and crime was down. Chicago's mayor at the time, William Hale Thompson — known as Big Bill — had just been re-elected and was spearheading an ambitious urban improvement program.

But in mid-July of 1919, just about everything that could go wrong in Chicago did. Among the headlines were a deadly dirigible crash, a bizarre kidnapping, race riots and a major public transit strike.

Read more
Music Interviews
12:03 pm
Sat May 12, 2012

Days With Dizzy: Arturo Sandoval On His Trumpet Mentor

Arturo Sandoval and Dizzy Gillespie on tour in Europe in 1991. Sandoval's new album, Dear Diz (Every Day I Think of You), is a tribute to his friend and mentor.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat May 12, 2012 6:10 pm

Cuban trumpeter Arturo Sandoval first met Dizzy Gillespie in Havana in 1977, when the American jazzman came to Cuba to play a concert. Sandoval showed him around the city, where the two men listened to the sounds of rumba music echoing through Havana's black neighborhoods. That night, Sandoval managed to play his trumpet for Gillespie — and blew him away.

Read more

Pages