Yuki Noguchi

Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Business Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington D.C. Since joining NPR in 2008, she's covered business and economic news, and has a special interest in workplace issues — everything from abusive working environments, to the idiosyncratic cubicle culture. In recent years she has covered the housing market meltdown, unemployment during the Great Recession, and covered the aftermath of the tsunami in Japan in 2011. As in her personal life, however, her coverage interests are wide-ranging, and have included things like entomophagy and the St. Louis Cardinals.

Prior to joining NPR, Yuki started her career as a reporter for The Washington Post. She reported on stories mostly about business and technology, and later became an editor.

Yuki grew up with a younger brother speaking her parents' native Japanese at home. She has a degree in history from Yale.

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Economy
4:18 pm
Tue July 26, 2011

What A Credit Ratings Cut Could Mean For The U.S.

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in April. The country's credit rating could suffer if Congress fails to address the nation's long-term debt.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

With a debt ceiling deadline approaching, party leaders spent the day counting votes.

There are two plans: One, the handiwork of House Majority Leader John Boehner (R-OH), the other from Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV).

The problem is that it's not clear that either one can muster the votes necessary for approval.

Monday night, President Obama dramatized the threat this way:

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Business
3:39 pm
Thu July 21, 2011

One Year Later, Financial Reform Questions Remain

President Obama signs the financial reform bill into law, July 21, 2010. Vice President Joe Biden, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV), then Senate Banking Chairman Christopher Dodd (D-CT), House Financial Services Committee Chairman Barney Frank (D-MA) and other lawmakers look on.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

A year ago Thursday, jubilant Democratic lawmakers — including then-Sen. Christopher Dodd and Rep. Barney Frank — joined President Obama on stage as the president signed a new financial reform law.

"The American people will never again be asked to foot the bill for Wall Street's mistakes. There will be no more tax-funded bailouts — period," Obama said.

The so-called Dodd-Frank Act will mean no firms are too big to fail, the president said.

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Business
3:32 pm
Tue July 19, 2011

Why Borders Failed While Barnes And Noble Survived

Borders Group Inc., the nation's second largest bookstore chain, announced that it will liquidate the company.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

It appears to be all over for the Borders bookselling chain. The company will be liquidated – meaning sold off in pieces – and almost 11,000 employees will lose their jobs. The chain's 400 remaining stores will close their doors by the end of September.

The retailer's first bookstore opened in Ann Arbor, Michigan 40 years ago. Along with competitor Barnes and Noble, Borders pioneered the book megastore business. But Borders made some critical missteps over the years that cost it the business.

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Children's Health
12:01 am
Wed June 22, 2011

Junk Food Fight: Should Ads Stop Targeting Teens?

A screen shot of Doritos Asylum 626 project, an interactive, online horror movie created to attract teenage consumers.
Asylum 626

Originally published on Wed June 22, 2011 9:01 am

The government says junk food marketers shouldn't advertise to kids. Not just on TV, but also online, in schools and in stores.

The guidelines being proposed are voluntary; food companies can opt out. Still, with four powerful agencies, including the Federal Trade Commission and the Food and Drug Administration, throwing their weight behind the proposal, the food industry is taking the measure seriously.

One of the most contentious issues is whether the marketing limits should be applied to older kids, aged 12 to 17 — like 13-year-old Reed Weisenberger.

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Europe
4:34 pm
Thu June 16, 2011

With Greece Near Default, Wider Impact Feared

Protesters in Athens gather in front of the Greek parliament as riot police stand guard Wednesday.
Aris Messinis AFP/Getty Images

With Greece in political and economic turmoil, financial market participants worry what effect it will have on the rest of the world. Euro-zone countries helped fund a previous rescue package for Greece. But French and German banks are still highly exposed to potential losses in Greece.

And that has investors in the U.S. and elsewhere worried about potential fallout.

If Greece is unable to pass austerity measures and cannot secure more international aid, it will start defaulting on $165 billion worth of debt this summer.

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