Sylvia Poggioli

Sylvia Poggioli is senior European correspondent for NPR's international desk covering political, economic, and cultural news in Italy, the Vatican, Western Europe and the Balkans. Poggioli's on-air reporting and analysis have encompassed the fall of communism in Eastern Europe, the turbulent civil war in the former Yugoslavia and how immigration has transformed European societies.

Since joining NPR's foreign desk in 1982, Poggioli has traveled extensively for reporting assignments. Most recently, she travelled to Norway to cover the aftermath of the brutal attacks by an ultra-rightwing extremist; to Greece, Spain, and Portugal for the latest on the euro-zone crisis; and the Balkans where the last wanted war criminals have been arrested.

In addition, Poggioli has traveled to France, Germany, United Kingdom, The Netherlands, Belgium, Austria, Sweden, and Denmark to produce in-depth reports on immigration, racism, Islam, and the rise of the right in Europe.

Throughout her career Poggioli has been recognized for her work with distinctions including: the WBUR Foreign Correspondent Award, the Welles Hangen Award for Distinguished Journalism, a George Foster Peabody and National Women's Political Caucus/Radcliffe College Exceptional Merit Media Awards, the Edward Weintal Journalism Prize, and the Silver Angel Excellence in the Media Award. Poggioli was part of the NPR team that won the 2000 Overseas Press Club Award for coverage of the war in Kosovo. In 2009, she received the Maria Grazia Cutulli Award for foreign reporting.

In 2000, Poggioli received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from Brandeis University. In 2006, she received an honorary degree from the University of Massachusetts at Boston together with Barack Obama.

Prior to this honor, Poggioli was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences "for her distinctive, cultivated and authoritative reports on 'ethnic cleansing' in Bosnia." In 1990, Poggioli spent an academic year at Harvard University as a research fellow at Harvard University's Center for Press, Politics, and Public Policy at the Kennedy School of Government.

From 1971 to 1986, Poggioli served as an editor on the English-language desk for the Ansa News Agency in Italy. She worked at the Festival of Two Worlds in Spoleto, Italy. She was actively involved with women's film and theater groups.

The daughter of Italian anti-fascists who were forced to flee Italy under Mussolini, Poggioli was born in Providence, Rhode Island, and grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She graduated from Harvard College with a Bachelor's degree in Romance languages and literature. She later studied in Italy under a Fulbright Scholarship.

Pages

Europe
5:15 pm
Wed July 27, 2011

Crime Writers Expose Scandinavia's Dark Side

Anders Behring Breivik (shown in an undated video) is accused of killing at least 76 people in Norway. Scandinavian crime writers have focused on many of the social issues at play in Breivik's case.
AFP/Getty Images

Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg expressed confidence Wednesday that his country's open, democratic society will not be intimidated by a right-wing extremist's brutal twin attacks that killed at least 76 people.

But questions are being raised about authorities' failure to recognize the potential threat from the ultra-right — a threat that has been clearly described by some of the country's leading crime writers.

Five days after the bombing at the government district and the killing spree at a youth camp, a mood of collective sorrow still grips Norway.

Read more
World
4:00 am
Tue July 26, 2011

Norway Questions Its Tolerance Of Extremism

Norway is starting a process of self-examination in the wake of last Friday's killings. In building an open and free society, there are those who believe Norwegians were too tolerant — even of those who threatened their society from within.

World
8:49 am
Wed June 29, 2011

Greek Parliament Approves Austerity Package

Protesters clash with riot police during a 48-hour general strike in Athens on Wednesday.
Aris Messinis AFP/Getty Images

European leaders and international financial markets breathed a sigh of relief Wednesday when the Greek Parliament voted in favor of a highly unpopular package of austerity measures.

Passage of the measures had been a condition set by the European Union and IMF for release of the next installment of the $155 billion bailout agreed to last year.

But outside Parliament, the streets of Athens were turned into a war zone as protesters and anti-riot police engaged in running battles.

Read more
Middle East
4:00 am
Tue June 28, 2011

Flotilla To Challenge Israel's Blockade Of Gaza

Hundreds of pro-Palestinian activists from the U.S., Europe and Canada are organizing a 10-ship flotilla to challenge Israel's economic blockade of the Gaza Strip.

Israel says the blockade is necessary to prevent smuggling of arms into Gaza. Hanging over the mission is the dark shadow of last year's flotilla that ended with an Israeli commando raid on a Turkish vessel and left nine activists dead.

The hub of this year's operation is Athens, Greece, where organizers accuse Israel of using diplomatic pressure to sabotage their effort.

Read more
Europe
7:22 am
Sat June 25, 2011

Has Greece Been Prescribed Bad Medicine For Crisis?

Greek police unions, coast guards and firemen protest outside the finance ministry in Athens against the new austerity package.
Loisa Gouliamaki AFP/Getty Images

Next week, the Greek government will reveal a five-year austerity plan drafted by the European Union, International Monetary Fund and European Central Bank.

Parliament's approval is required if Greece is to receive an installment of $17 billion as part of last year's international bailout. But the new measures include even deeper spending cuts and tax hikes than those that have triggered weeks of massive street demonstrations.

Many economists believe Greece's international lenders are prescribing a harmful and inefficient medicine.

Read more

Pages