Sonari Glinton

Sonari Glinton is a NPR Business Desk reporter based at our NPR West bureau. He covers the auto industry, consumer goods and consumer behavior, as well as marketing and advertising.

In this position, which he has held since late 2010, Glinton has tackled big stories including GM's road back to profitability and Toyota's continuing struggles. Glinton has traveled throughout the Midwest covering important stories such as the tornado in Joplin, Missouri, and the 2012 presidential race. He has also covered the U.S. Senate and House for NPR.

Glinton came to NPR in August 2007 and worked as a producer for All Things Considered. During that time he produced interviews with everyone from UN Ambassador Susan Rice to Joan Rivers. The highlight for Glinton came when he produced Robert Siegel's 50 Great Voices piece on Nat King Cole.

Glinton began his public radio career as an intern at member station WBEZ in Chicago. He went on to produce and report for WBEZ. While in Chicago he focused on juvenile justice and the Cook County Board of Commissioners. Prior to journalism Glinton had a career in finance.

Glinton attended Boston University.

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Business
3:49 pm
Thu June 30, 2011

Toyota Steers Ads To Bring In More Minority Buyers

Customers walk past a Toyota FJ Cruiser. Toyota brought in 19 percent of African-American buyers, 22 percent of Latino buyers and 33 percent of Asian-American buyers.
Yoshikazu Tsuno Getty Images

The Japanese automaker Toyota has taken its fair share of hits in the past year and a half: The earthquake and tsunami in Japan as well as last year's recall fiasco have helped erode the company's share of the U.S. car market.

But one place Toyota remains No. 1 is with minority car buyers — Latinos, African-Americans and Asian-Americans continue to buy more Toyotas than any other car brand, domestic or foreign.

Toyota's claim on the minority market has the Rev. Jesse Jackson questioning other car companies' practices.

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Economy
5:29 pm
Fri June 24, 2011

Weak Jobs Market Takes Heavier Toll On Black Men

People looking for jobs wait in line to speak with potential employers at the Brooklyn Job Fair on April 13 in New York City.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

President Obama spent Friday pushing job creation in manufacturing, but he's getting increasing pressure for job results from a key part of his base: African Americans.

The unemployment rate for black men is about double the national average — and economists don't expect that number to fall to the single digits anywhere in the near future.

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Economy
4:57 pm
Wed June 22, 2011

Auto Industry Adjusts To New Normal: Low Sales

A salesman looks at Ford Fusion cars with customers on the lot at the Serramonte Ford dealership in Colma, Calif. This year, Ford Motor Co. reported its best first-quarter earnings since 1998, at $2.6 billion.
David Paul Morris Getty Images

The U.S. auto market is slowly rebounding. But even as sales increase, they're still not at the peaks hit 10 years ago. In 2000 and 2001, more than 17 million automobiles were sold in America. Last year, just under 12 million were sold.

But many analysts, dealers and executives believe the industry is actually healthier selling far fewer cars.

"That 16 to 17 million sales level that we experienced was not a normal situation," says Jeremy Anwyl, CEO of car site Edmunds.com.

He says a lot of the factors that kept car sales high won't be seen again.

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Business
3:51 pm
Thu June 9, 2011

As U.S. Sales Stall, Automakers Take Brands Overseas

Car sales in the U.S. have stalled. Right now, GM sells more cars in China than it does here.

Around the world, American brands have a much higher "cool factor" than they do here at home. And U.S. car companies are looking to exploit that.

The future of the American car companies can be summed up in one acronym, BRIC: Brazil, Russia, India and China.

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Business
8:00 am
Sat June 4, 2011

Hyundai's Rivals Better Prepare For A Bumpy Ride

The big winner in the auto industry in the last few months has been the Korean automaker Hyundai. Last month while car sales stalled, Hyundai had its biggest month ever. Analysts point to Hyundai's success as a sign of the increasingly competitive nature of the U.S. car market. Long gone are the days of the Big Three; now it's more like the Big Thirteen. NPR's Sonari Glinton reports on Hyundai and the fractured American car market.

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