Scott Horsley

Scott Horsley is a White House correspondent for NPR News. He reports on the policy and politics of the Obama Administration, with a special emphasis on economic issues.

The 2012 campaign is the third presidential contest Horsley has covered for NPR. He previously reported on Senator John McCain's White House bid in 2008 and Senator John Kerry's campaign in 2004. Thanks to this experience, Horsley has become an expert in the motel shampoo offerings of various battleground states.

Horsley took up the White House beat after serving as a San Diego-based business correspondent for NPR where he covered fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley was a reporter for member station KPBS-FM, where he received numerous honors, including a Public Radio News Directors' award for coverage of the California energy crisis.

Earlier in his career, Horsley worked as a reporter for WUSF-FM in Tampa, Florida, and as a news writer and reporter for commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University.

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Politics
4:45 pm
Tue July 5, 2011

What A Debt Default Would Really Mean For The U.S.

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke (from left), Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner and FDIC Chairwoman Sheila Bair host the first meeting of the Financial Stability Oversight Council last October.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Washington lawmakers returned from a long holiday weekend on Tuesday, with just four weeks left to raise the federal debt ceiling or run the risk of a government default.

Many lawmakers insist that they won't vote to raise the debt limit unless there's also a deal to cut the deficit.

That would leave the government, which now borrows more than 40 cents of every dollar, suddenly without a working credit card.

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Politics
8:00 am
Sat June 25, 2011

The President's Week Ends On A Productive Note

President Obama says if America wants a strong, growing economy, it needs robust, growing factories. In Pittsburgh Friday, Obama launched a new partnership with businesses and universities. It's designed to give a boost to the manufacturing sector in hopes that factories will then offer more, good-paying jobs. The announcement capped a week in which Obama also began winding down the war in Afghanistan and tip-toed around the fight over same-sex marriage. NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

Business
12:01 am
Fri June 24, 2011

Obama: We Need More Manufacturing Jobs

Workers with circuit boards on a production line.
Istock

President Obama is in Pittsburgh Friday to highlight American manufacturing, which he hopes to boost with a series of appearances and a program called the Advanced Manufacturing Partnership.

Coming from the industrial Midwest, Obama knows the value of factory jobs. From his first days in office, he's been talking about lighting a fire under the nation's factory boilers.

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Politics
12:01 am
Tue June 21, 2011

In 2012 GOP Race, Climate Policy Is A Non-Issue

Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman addresses the Faith and Freedom Coalition in Washington, D.C. In the upcoming Republican primaries, limits on carbon emissions — which Huntsman once supported — are not expected to be a pivotal issue.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman formally kicks off his presidential campaign Tuesday, with New York's Statue of Liberty as a backdrop. He's hoping some tired and poor Republicans are yearning for a different kind of candidate. Huntsman holds moderate views on immigration and same-sex civil unions, and he wasn't afraid to serve in the Obama administration, as U.S. ambassador to China.

As governor, Huntsman was also a leader in a regional effort to control greenhouse gases, by capping carbon emissions and trading pollution permits.

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Politics
12:01 am
Tue June 14, 2011

More Burger Tests: Good For Health But Too Costly?

Authorities in Europe are trying to pin down the cause of a widespread and deadly outbreak of food poisoning. In the U.S., the Obama Administration is wrestling with a proposal to screen hamburger for additional varieties of deadly E.coli bacteria.

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