Scott Horsley

Scott Horsley is a White House correspondent for NPR News. He reports on the policy and politics of the Obama Administration, with a special emphasis on economic issues.

The 2012 campaign is the third presidential contest Horsley has covered for NPR. He previously reported on Senator John McCain's White House bid in 2008 and Senator John Kerry's campaign in 2004. Thanks to this experience, Horsley has become an expert in the motel shampoo offerings of various battleground states.

Horsley took up the White House beat after serving as a San Diego-based business correspondent for NPR where he covered fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley was a reporter for member station KPBS-FM, where he received numerous honors, including a Public Radio News Directors' award for coverage of the California energy crisis.

Earlier in his career, Horsley worked as a reporter for WUSF-FM in Tampa, Florida, and as a news writer and reporter for commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University.

Later this week, Vice President Biden will host another meeting with Republican and Democratic lawmakers, looking for ways to reduce the federal budget deficit.

The red ink they'll be discussing reflects both government spending and deliberate moves to reduce taxes, including a major round of cuts signed into law by President George W. Bush ten years ago Tuesday.

The signing ceremony was originally going to be outdoors, on the South Lawn of the White House, but rain forced a hasty relocation to the East Room.

President Obama traveled to Ohio Friday to visit an auto plant. He was there to celebrate the success of the federal bailout and restructuring of the nation's auto industry. But his appearance coincided with a disappointing jobs report that showed unemployment has climbed to 9.1 percent. NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner travels to Capitol Hill on Thursday with a warning for freshmen lawmakers: They must vote to increase the government's credit limit or risk an economic catastrophe.

Earlier this week, the House voted overwhelmingly against such an increase. Some lawmakers believe the government can leave the debt ceiling unchanged and still avoid dire consequences.

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