WYSO

Ohio Public Radio

The Statehouse News Bureau was founded in 1980 to provide educational, comprehensive coverage of legislation, elections, issues and other activities surrounding the Statehouse to Ohio's public radio and television stations. To this day, the Bureau remains the only broadcast outlet dedicated to in-depth coverage of state government news and topics of statewide interest. The Bureau is funded through eTech Ohio, and is managed by ideastream.

The reporters at the Bureau follow the concerns of the citizens and voters of Ohio, as well as the actions of the Governor, the Ohio General Assembly, the Ohio Supreme Court, and other elected officials. We strive to cover statehouse news, government issues, Ohio politics, and concerns of business, culture and the arts with balance and fairness, and work to present diverse voices and points of view from the Statehouse and throughout Ohio.

The three award-winning journalists at the bureau have more than 60 combined years of radio and television experience. They can be heard on National Public Radio and are regular contributors to Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Marketplace.

Every weekday, the Statehouse News Bureau produces in-depth news reports for Ohio's public radio stations. Those stories are also available on this website, either on the front page or in our archives. Weekly, the Statehouse News Bureau produces a television show from our studios in the Statehouse. The State of Ohio is an unique blend of news, interviews, talk and analysis, and is broadcast on Ohio's public television stations.

The Statehouse News Bureau also produces special programming throughout the year, including the Governor's annual State of the State address to the Ohio General Assembly and a five-part year-end review.

Minnesota Sen. Al Franken plans an announcement tomorrow following calls for his resignation based on numerous accusations of unwanted advances.
LORIE SHAULL / WIKIMEDIA

Ohio’s U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown is among those calling for the resignation of fellow Democrat Al Franken.

 

Several women have accused the Minnesota Senator and former comedian of making unwanted advances, including groping and forcibly kissing them. Brown made the announcement Wednesday morning.

 

Statehouse News Bureau

State Auditor Dave Yost says questions about past drug convictions of a consultant who played a key role in Ohio’s new medical marijuana program, set to begin operation in September, need to be addressed now. He says it’s time for an investigation.

Yost says he’s troubled by reports that the consultant who graded applications from companies seeking licenses had drug convictions in his past.

“This is an epic fail. I’m outraged,” he said.

Yost questions how someone with those convictions could be hired by the state for $150,000 to do that work.

Dan Konik

Former Ohio Senate President Bill Harris has passed away after months of battling cancer. Harris was born in Tennessee and got his college degree in Arizona, but his political career was all Ohio. In 1995, he left his car dealership in Ashland after being easily elected, in a heavily Republican district, to the Ohio House. The Marine veteran served there until 2000 when former Gov. Bob Taft appointed him to fill the Senate seat vacated by former Senator Dick Schafrath, who took an administrative position.

Jo Ingles (Ohio Public Radio)

Democratic Presidential nominee Hillary Clinton’s loss to Republican President elect Donald Trump wasn’t the only blistering defeat for Ohio’s Democratic Party. The state Legislature, which was already Republican dominated, became even redder and it's left the leader of the Ohio Democratic Party evaluating the losses and where the party goes from here.

Clinton’s loss was devastating, according to Ohio Democratic Party Chairman David Pepper who said, “What we saw was a tidal wave that was far bigger than Ohio.”

ECOT

The Ohio Department of Education wants to know how much learning is actually going on among the more than 17,000 students at the state’s largest online charter school, ECOT. Some of the school's students are taking a stand. 

18 year old Gabriel Young is featured in one of ECOT’s latest commercials, in which he states, “I was adopted for seven years and then put back.”

Young lives on his own, and says ECOT’s flexible system fits his schedule. And he adds that the work students do can’t always be tracked through log-in information.

Libertarian Party of Ohio delivers petitions to put Charlie Earl on the ballot as presidential nominee in hopes of swapping Earl out for Johnson.
Credit Statehouse News Bureau

The Libertarian Party of Ohio made a dicey move to try to get their presidential nominee, Gary Johnson, onto the ballot. But as Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, that move ultimately paid off.

According to Chow, Ohio’s Libertarians always planned on swapping in Gary Johnson for former gubernatorial candidate Charlie Earl, who was listed on the official paperwork.

Duke Energy power lines, energy
Duke Energy

Ohioans could see a new charge in their electric bills as early as June, now that state regulators have approved plans by FirstEnergy and AEP to guarantee income for struggling coal plants. But while opponents are fighting the ruling, those utilities are touting the benefits.

Groups against the so-called coal plant bailout say the ruling from the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio gives AEP and FirstEnergy an unfair competitive advantage.

But AEP President, Pablo Vegas, says his utility needed the ability to charge customers more in order to stabilize costs.

Democratic presidential candidate Martin O'Malley has failed to qualify for Ohio's primary ballot, falling short of the signatures needed to appear before the state's voters.

A spokesman for Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted tells The Associated Press that O'Malley failed to get the 1,000 valid signatures needed to appear on March 15 primary ballots. The former Maryland governor's campaign submitted 1,175 signatures, but only 772 were found to be valid.

Original uploader was Wooyi at en.wikipedia - Congressional bioguide entry

Former Congressman Jim Traficant died Saturday after a tractor he was riding flipped over on his family farm. The fiery and colorful Democrat from Youngstown, Ohio, is one of only four members ever to be kicked out of Congress. That was in 2002, after he was convicted of bribery and racketeering.

Before he was convicted and expelled from Congress, Jim Traficant was best known for his improbable hair piece and his outlandish suits. And the broadsides he launched at Republicans, his fellow Democrats and big government.

Ohio’s Democratic Candidate for Governor is calling on Republican Governor John Kasich to halt the third grade guarantee. He also wants more money for public education.

Cuyahoga County Executive Ed FitzGerald told members of the state’s largest teachers union that there are things state leaders need to do to help public education be successful in Ohio.

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