WYSO

M.L. Schultze

M.L. Schultze came to WKSU as news director in July 2007 after 25 years at The Repository in Canton, where she was managing editor for nearly a decade. She’s now the digital editor and an award-winning reporter and analyst who has appeared on NPR, Here and Now and the TakeAway, as well as being a regular panelist on Ideas, the WVIZ public television's reporter roundtable.

Schultze's work includes ongoing reporting on community-police relations; immigration; fracking and extensive state, local and national political coverage. She’s also past president of Ohio Associated Press Media Editors and the Akron Press Club, and remains on the board of both.

A native of the Philadelphia, Pa., area, Schultze graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in magazine journalism and political science. She lives in Canton with her husband, Rick Senften, the retired special projects editor at The Rep and now a specialist working with kids involved in the juvenile courts. Their daughter, Gwen, lives and works in the Washington, D.C.-area with her husband and two sons. Their son, Christopher, lives in Hawaii.

In Ohio, state lawmakers and voting advocates are working on perhaps-competing plans to revamp Congressional redistricting. But ours is not the only state struggling with how political maps are drawn. A Wisconsin case is before the U.S. Supreme Court. A voter initiative is underway in Michigan. Lawmakers are debating change in Pennsylvania. And California has replaced politicians with a citizen commission. In the final installment of our series, “Gerrymandering: Shading the Lines,” WKSU’s M.L. Schultze looks at the efforts here and elsewhere.

Ohio’s 4th Congressional District isn’t the longest in the state. Nor the most convoluted. Nor does it have the most disenfranchised voters. But it has the distinction of being near the top in all three categories -- and of being home to one of the most liberal communities in the country represented by one of the most conservative members of Congress. In the third part of our series “Gerrymandering: Shading the lines,” WKSU’s M.L. Schultze travels the 4th – a study of contrasts from south to north.

ACLU

Two new studies reveal some unintended consequences for the the effort to eliminate questions about criminal records from initial job applications The ban-the-box problems are not caused by the former-felons it was supposed to help, but by the employers who are supposed be more likely to hire them.

Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

Both of Ohio’s U.S. senators expressed surprise at President Trump’s announcement today that he will bar transgender people from serving in the military. 

Trump made his surprise declaration in a series of Twitter posts, saying the military can’t afford what he claimed are the “tremendous medical costs and disruption” that comes with transgender people.

Democrat Sherrod Brown called that ungrounded.

Press photo

Ohio’s U.S. Sen. Rob Portman expects President Donald Trump’s budget will go through big changes in Congress, though perhaps not quite as big as in the past.

President Trump’s 2018 budget includes major cuts in social welfare, research and environmental programs, builds a wall along the southern border, and presumes a rate of growth based on tax cuts that will balance the budget in 10 years.

Akron, Ohio, picked a heck of a year to try to put joy back into voting. After all, two-thirds of likely voters in a recent Ohio poll picked "disgust" to describe their attitude towards politics.

Still, with the help of goats, virtual wrestling, and a pickup truck called Percival, a group of joyful voters thinks it can counter that.

The presidential race in Ohio is a dead heat, according to the latest Quinnipiac swing-state poll. The poll indicates that very few Ohioans say they still haven’t made up their minds – and a lot of them say they’re more motivated to vote than ever.

The polling data indicates Donald Trump’s 5-point lead in the Buckeye State two weeks ago has faded, and voters are now evenly split: 45 percent for Trump; 45 percent for Hillary Clinton. Most of the rest say they’d go Libertarian, but 2 percent say they still aren’t sure how they’ll vote on Nov. 8.

M.L. Schultze / WKSU

Eastern Ohio’s Trumbull County leans traditionally Democratic – but there’s  a lot of support this year for Donald Trump. And a handful of people were holding Trump signs outside the union hall where Joe Biden spoke.

But overall, it was friendly territory for the vice president – a United Autoworkers hall around the corner from the now-thriving GM plant saved by the auto-industry bailout.

In October, the Trump administration instituted an immediate new rule allowing more employers to opt out of Affordable Care Act mandates covering free contraception if they object on moral or religious grounds.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

Donald Trump’s trip to Youngstown Monday differed in style from most of his other presidential stump speeches along the Ohio/Pennsylvania border. What did not change was his call to slow immigration, the passion of his supporters – and the dearth of Ohio’s political leaders on stage with him.

Trump billed the speech as a major foreign policy address. And it was clear from the get-go that there would be no riffing by the candidate on building a wall with Mexico – though that’s often his biggest applause line.

The Ohio Democratic Party Chairman says Democrats are mostly united around Clinton and determined to stop Trump.
M.L. Schultze / WKSU

Hillary Clinton and her running mate Tim Kaine will head out of Philadelphia Friday and toward the key swing-state of Ohio officially beginning of the general election campaign.

After a rally in Philadelphia, Clinton is heading to Harrisburg, Pittsburgh and then onto Youngstown and Columbus over the weekend.
 

As the DNC was wrapping up, Ohio Democratic Party Chairman David Pepper said that the stop in Youngstown is key.

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