Lewis Wallace

Managing Editor and Reporter

Lewis Wallace comes to WYSO from the Pritzker Journalism Fellowship at WBEZ in Chicago, where he reported on the environment, technology, science and economics. Prior to going down the public radio rabbit hole, he was a community organizer and producer for a multimedia project about youth and policing in Chicago. Originally from Ann Arbor, MI, Lewis spent many years as a freelance writer, anti-oppression trainer, barista and sex educator in Chicago and in Oakland, CA. He holds a B.A. in Religious Studies from Northwestern University, and he has expanded his journalism training through the 2013 Metcalf Fellowship for Environmental Journalism and the Institutes for Journalism and Natural Resources.

Lewis contributes regularly to NPR and Marketplace, and also loves working with WYSO's growing team of community producers. His reporting on the rollout of the federal Affordable Care Act for WYSO won two 2013 national Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI) awards in the small station category for continuing coverage (first place) and best news feature (second place). His features produced for the series WYSO Curious won 2014 PRNDI awards for use of sound (first place) and broadcast writing (second place). He won several 2014 Ohio AP Awards, including best reporter in the Radio II category.

Lewis is transgender and goes by the pronouns "he" and "him."

Ways To Connect

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

The city of Dayton has discontinued, then reinstated, its use of traffic cameras.

Monday was the first day of a state law effectively banning the use of static red light and speed cameras to ticket drivers. The law requires a police officer to be present in order for a ticket to be issued based on a violation caught on camera.

But several cities, including Akron, Springfield, Dayton and Toledo filed lawsuits against the state, saying the law violated the cities’ home rule authority.

Two more cities are challenging an Ohio traffic camera law they say would restrict cities' use of the cameras and are asking county courts to find the law unconstitutional.

Dayton and Springfield sued the state Wednesday, saying the law violates their right to home rule authority to set their own policies and regulations. Akron and Toledo earlier filed similar lawsuits.

A sketch of the future Water Street District in downtown Dayton on the riverfront.
Courtesy of developers Crawford Hoying and Woodard.

The ground was officially broken at Dayton’s Water Street apartment development Thursday morning. The 215-unit luxury apartment complex is part of an investment partnership between Columbus-based Crawford Hoying and Dayton based Woodard Real Estate. The original plan called for fewer units and less money invested, but the project has expanded since it was first announced.

The UD Flyers hit the court at University of Dayton Arena Tuesday afternoon for practice.
Jerry Kenney

UPDATE: Dayton secured a 56-55 victory over Boise State Wednesday evening. The Flyers will head to Columbus Friday to play 6-seed Providence.


Manufacturing is coming back to Ohio, although the jobs are coming in something of a trickle and there are still far fewer than there were before the Recession.

Plus, the jobs themselves are different: many companies are actually paying less for the same work. Auto parts manufacturing has been an area of particularly steep declines: median earnings in Ohio fell nearly 10 percent from 2001 to 2013, with even lower wages for new hires.

Marie Geisel joined the Dayton Citizens Water Brigade on Tuesday before a packed plan board meeting.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The debate over Dayton’s source water protection policy is still simmering, although the issues have changed somewhat since the idea of an update to the policy was first floated last summer.

Congressman Mike Turner at Delphi Hearing in 2013

Former employees of auto parts company Delphi, including many in the Dayton area, are working to get a health care tax credit back on the agenda in Congress. About 20,000 people, many of them in Ohio, lost health care and part of their pensions during the GM bankruptcy in 2009; Delphi spun off from GM in 1999, but pensions and health care remained intertwined for employees of the parts-maker.

Antioch College Aims To Build Sustainable Village On Campus
Image courtesty of Antioch College

This weekend Antioch College kicks off a community input process for a housing project that would be located on the college campus.

Housing, and especially affordable housing, is a big issue in Yellow Springs—where housing prices never tanked the way they did regionally, and both rentals and purchases run high.

"Patches" is one of the C-123 cargo planes used to spray Agent Orange. It's now on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs says it will make an announcement next week about treatment for Air Force reservists who may have been exposed to Agent Orange after Vietnam. Ohio U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown has joined the chorus of voices asking for a policy change.

Ohio Governor John Kaisch's fifth State of the State speech took place at the Roberts Center in Wilmington Tuesday.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Governor John Kasich gave his fifth State of the State address in Wilmington Tuesday night. Kasich’s speech was something of a pep rally for his proposed two-year budget. He says since he’s been in office, he’s balanced the budget and created a surplus of $1.5 billion—now he wants to increase that margin. He’s also pushing for more income tax cuts for individuals and businesses.