Lewis Wallace

Managing Editor and Reporter

Lewis Wallace comes to WYSO from the Pritzker Journalism Fellowship at WBEZ in Chicago, where he reported on the environment, technology, science and economics. Prior to going down the public radio rabbit hole, he was a community organizer and producer for a multimedia project about youth and policing in Chicago. Originally from Ann Arbor, MI, Lewis spent many years as a freelance writer, anti-oppression trainer, barista and sex educator in Chicago and in Oakland, CA. He holds a B.A. in Religious Studies from Northwestern University, and he has expanded his journalism training through the 2013 Metcalf Fellowship for Environmental Journalism and the Institutes for Journalism and Natural Resources.

Lewis contributes regularly to NPR and Marketplace, and also loves working with WYSO's growing team of community producers. His reporting on the rollout of the federal Affordable Care Act for WYSO won two 2013 national Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI) awards in the small station category for continuing coverage (first place) and best news feature (second place). His features produced for the series WYSO Curious won 2014 PRNDI awards for use of sound (first place) and broadcast writing (second place). He won several 2014 Ohio AP Awards, including best reporter in the Radio II category.

Lewis is transgender and goes by the pronouns "he" and "him."

Ways To Connect

A retired Air Force drone is used in the classroom at Sinclair Community College.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Supporters of drone development are anxiously awaiting a first draft of Federal Aviation Administration regulations expected to come out soon. Right now hobbyists can fly drones—the industry term is unmanned aerial systems or UAS—but companies are prohibited from flying them outdoors unless they have special federal authorization for individual flights. The FAA said it would release a proposed rule by the end of 2014 to regulate commercial drones in U.S.

money
401kcalculator.org/Flickr/Creative Commons

A national report by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy ranks Ohio 18th in the country for most imbalanced tax systems. In a “regressive” tax system, low- and middle-income people pay a larger balance of their incomes in state and local taxes than high earners. The study finds very few states with “progressive” tax systems, and ranks Washington, Florida, Texas, South Dakota and Illinois as the top five for regressive systems.

 of the Cornerstone development near I-675 in Centerville. Costco opened there in November 2014.
Oberer Companies

The owners of the Cornerstone development, where a Costco store opened in November, have filed a lawsuit against Sugarcreek Township over fire and emergency services.

The view from the old employee entrance to the Moraine GM plant, where Fuyao plans to put a new entrance to the plant.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

A year after the announcement of a new auto-glass factory in Moraine, Fuyao Glass America Inc. says it will add another 750 jobs to the plant as it ramps up U.S. production. Fuyao had previously committed to bring 800 jobs to the former General Motors plant south of Dayton, which had been mostly abandoned since 2008. The addition of after-market automotive glass manufacturing in the planned factory brings the total expected jobs up to more than 1500.

An overgrown field was a golf course not long ago.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Since the recession, more than 100 golf courses have closed each year in the U.S., but what happens to all that green? Turns out some golf courses are going even greener: they're getting "re-wilded."

In a dry, overgrown field of thistles and goldenrod, Michael Enright, the conservation manager with Five Rivers MetroParks, explains that not too long ago, this was a trim, manicured golf course called Larch Tree.

“I’ve been to Africa several times and it reminds me of the savannah there when I look out across it,” said Enright.

The Great Miami River is connected to the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, where Dayton gets its water.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has finished a one-year study of the Great Miami River Corridor, which looked at opportunities for economic development along a 99-mile stretch. The area studied runs from around Sidney, up in Shelby County, down to the city of Hamilton in Butler County.

Satellite view of toxic algal bloom on Lake Erie
NASA Earth Observatory

Toxic blue-green algae blooms, or cyanobacteria, are a growing problem in Ohio’s lakes, and grabbed the attention of the whole country after the bacteria shut down Toledo’s water system last summer.

The race track at the north Dayton racino under construction in 2014. Racino owner Penn National can't agree with the state of Ohio on a relocation payment to the city of Dayton.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The mayor of Dayton says the state needs to act soon to get the city a $500,000 racino payment it’s owed by law. The money got hung up at the very end of the recent lame-duck session, when Governor John Kasich vetoed a line-item amendment to a bill that resolved a long-standing dispute over the money.

Uber has been criticized for competing with taxi cabs without being subject to the same regulation.
Al Fed / Flickr/Creative Commons

The city of Dayton has unanimously amended its taxi and transportation ordinance to regulate Uber and other new transportation network services for the first time. UberX is an app-based ride service that’s been controversial in some cities in part because it competes with taxis, but isn’t regulated the same way.

Towards the end of the year in 2008, gas prices dipped to a similar low.  oil gas pump price
Nicholas Eckhart / Flickr/Creative Commons

The price of gas is at a new low this week, with Ohio’s average around $1.99 per gallon, down about 80 cents from last month and down about $1.38 from the 2013 average.

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