Lewis Wallace

Managing Editor and Reporter

Lewis Wallace comes to WYSO from the Pritzker Journalism Fellowship at WBEZ in Chicago, where he reported on the environment, technology, science and economics. Prior to going down the public radio rabbit hole, he was a community organizer and producer for a multimedia project about youth and policing in Chicago. Originally from Ann Arbor, MI, Lewis spent many years as a freelance writer, anti-oppression trainer, barista and sex educator in Chicago and in Oakland, CA. He holds a B.A. in Religious Studies from Northwestern University, and he has expanded his journalism training through the 2013 Metcalf Fellowship for Environmental Journalism and the Institutes for Journalism and Natural Resources.

Lewis contributes regularly to NPR and Marketplace, and also loves working with WYSO's growing team of community producers. His reporting on the rollout of the federal Affordable Care Act for WYSO won two 2013 national Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI) awards in the small station category for continuing coverage (first place) and best news feature (second place). His features produced for the series WYSO Curious won 2014 PRNDI awards for use of sound (first place) and broadcast writing (second place). He won several 2014 Ohio AP Awards, including best reporter in the Radio II category.

Lewis is transgender and goes by the pronouns "he" and "him."

Ways To Connect

A screen shot from healthcare.gov, the website for the Affordable Care Act health plans.
WCPN

A report released today finds more than 202,000 Ohio residents have signed up during this open enrollment period. That’s more than 45,000 more than the number who enrolled last time around through the federal marketplace.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says about 12,000 people in the Dayton area have signed up in the last three months.

Gabrielle Civil in a previous performance entitled "And then..." at Antioch College.
Dennie Eagleson

WYSO is planning a series of commentaries in the coming weeks from local professors and leaders in the black community, in honor of Black History Month in February. To kick it off, Antioch College Associate Professor of Performance Gabrielle Civil is on air Friday morning, Jan. 30, to preview upcoming events at Antioch College.

Civil is holding a story circle in collaboration with Coretta Scott King Center director Mila Cooper. Details provided by Antioch College are below; information about other events will be added as they become available. 

A C-123 image from an old Air Force training slide.
Insomnia Cured Here / Flickr/Creative Commons

A new study finds some Air Force reservists could have been exposed to Agent Orange while flying missions in the U.S. Vets who have been denied benefits claims are hoping the Veterans Administration will change its stance on Agent Orange exposure outside Vietnam, and this independent report by the non-profit Institute of Medicine could help their cause.

 

The Kmart store in Springfield has closed. As a result of the store's closure, 68 jobs will be lost.
Wayne Baker / WYSO

The state of Ohio released local job and unemployment numbers Tuesday, and the news is looking good for Dayton and the state. In December 2014, the statewide unemployment rate dipped to a seasonally adjusted 4.8 percent, the lowest it’s been since 2001. The greater Dayton area was down to 4.5 percent, almost two percentage points lower than it was at the end of 2013.

A map provided by the Miami Valley Regional Planning Commission shows the rail spur crossing I-75 to the airport.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Residents of Butler Township and Vandalia are working to block a rail line extension near the Dayton Airport.

Dr. Kimberly Barrett (left) and Dr. Joann Wright Mawasha organized the forum at Wright State along with Dayton Police.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

About fifty people attended a forum on race and policing at Wright State Tuesday evening intended to move community members from dialogue to action around racial bias and police.

“There’s a difficult and torturous history of race and policing in this country,” said Dayton Police Chief Richard Biehl, who helped facilitate. “That history is not over. We’re still living it.”

Sherrod Brown
WCPN

Ohio’s Democratic U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown is grinding the ax of tax reform in advance of Tuesday’s State of the Union address. Brown wants to expand the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) under a proposal he’s calling the “Working Families Tax Relief Act.”

A retired Air Force drone is used in the classroom at Sinclair Community College.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Supporters of drone development are anxiously awaiting a first draft of Federal Aviation Administration regulations expected to come out soon. Right now hobbyists can fly drones—the industry term is unmanned aerial systems or UAS—but companies are prohibited from flying them outdoors unless they have special federal authorization for individual flights. The FAA said it would release a proposed rule by the end of 2014 to regulate commercial drones in U.S.

money
401kcalculator.org/Flickr/Creative Commons

A national report by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy ranks Ohio 18th in the country for most imbalanced tax systems. In a “regressive” tax system, low- and middle-income people pay a larger balance of their incomes in state and local taxes than high earners. The study finds very few states with “progressive” tax systems, and ranks Washington, Florida, Texas, South Dakota and Illinois as the top five for regressive systems.

 of the Cornerstone development near I-675 in Centerville. Costco opened there in November 2014.
Oberer Companies

The owners of the Cornerstone development, where a Costco store opened in November, have filed a lawsuit against Sugarcreek Township over fire and emergency services.

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